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Boundaries

Posted by Artistnotinresidence - Created: 3 years ago
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9 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 9)

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Posted by Kanak - 3 years ago

Just to clarify for anyone else in a similar situation, the experts are called géometres because they work by triangulation.  There is an idea that someone (maybe the person who organised the bornage) owns the bornes, but often a bornage  will begin from a piquet placed randomly in the middle of the plot, and then all the calculations define the parcelle in a series of triangles, which means that the final boundary lines are between the 'flag-hole' in the centre of the red squares/hexagons.  To claim to own all the red marker  would effectively be 'cutting corners'.  I hope relations improve, but she seems obstinate!  It isn't whether two centimetres matters, but whether she has understood the process.

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Posted by Artistnotinresidence - 3 years ago

Thank you everyone, that's very helpful, particularly wattebled. I will make sure that the bornes and the space between them are clearly on her land. I really would like to get on with this neighbour but she makes it very difficult, won't discuss in person at all but sends me letters, so if we can ensure that the fence is not a bone of contention perhaps relations will improve. The fence is willow hurdles and does not obstruct her view at all so that should not be an issue. Anyway, all much clearer now. 

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Posted by Kanak - 3 years ago

Hi  Artistnotinresidence, So you have a plan, and two bornes.  If they are the recent red square type, marked OGE, the line of demarcation runs along a taut string drawn between the holes in the centre of each piquet.  It sounds as though you are not contesting this.  Your problem could be  that the supports of your fenceare not well enough on your side to ensure that the fence/panels do not  drift over by the slightest hairsbreadth, otherwise, yes, she can ask you to move it back ,but only if it really crosses the line.  A piece of taut string has in fact, practically zero thickness, so I dont understand the problem.  Sounds as though you and your fencer worked together well, but sorry, there is nothing like a boundary dispute to fire up the French.

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Posted by wattebled - 3 years ago

If the boundary line is hers then obviously your fence should not be on or over that line at any point. The cadastre normally has a small mark on the boundary line to show to which parcelle of land the boundary belongs.

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Posted by Emu-408495 - 3 years ago

It might be best to simply ask your neighbour what would be acceptable to her as to where the fence is placed.  This could save you a lot of problems in the future.  Perhaps it is the fence itself that she does not like.  Have you removed her view by putting it Up?  

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Posted by Artistnotinresidence - 3 years ago

Thanks for your reply. I absolutely understand that it matters to her (and when I say it doesn't matter to me, I just mean that I am happy for her to have as much land as she considers to be hers, within reason, of course). I have been unfailingly polite and helpful and have asked the builder to come and make sure the bornes are exposed and that there is a line between them to demonstrate that the fence is not on her land. If we have made a mistake and this is not the case I have assured her that we will move it immediately. All I would like to know is, if the fence approaches the mid line between the centre of the bornes, is that ok?  Or should the bornes and the line between them be altogether, as she claims, on her land. I do not want to fall out with her and have tried to be friendly, but equally I don't want to rebuild the fence if it's perfectly legal as it is. 

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Posted by Artistnotinresidence - 3 years ago

Thanks for your reply. Our neighbour has had a geometre come and draw up the plan, we both have a copy, so there is no doubt where the boundary is and I have made sure the fence is on our side of the bornes. The chap who put in the fence is going to come and pull a string between the bornes so that she can see that we have respected the boundaries. I am just wondering if, should the fence lean slightly towards the mid line between the bornes, (as I say this is a matter of a centimetre or two, because we will be sure never to cross that line),  whether she can expect us to move it, or whether the mid line is in fact the boundary. It's hard to know. 

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Posted by Emu-408495 - 3 years ago

It may not matter to you but it matters to your neighbour.  If your neighbour is unhappy then you need to resolve the problem before it becomes worse.  Get the boundary properly marked and if your fence in in the wrong place then move it immediately. There is no point in getting on the wrong side of your neighbours.  

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Posted by Fish24 - 3 years ago

As there appears to be a doubt, why not go to your local 'cadastre' and ask for two enlarged copies of the legal line, one for her and one for you and then discuss and apply the result?  What is your fencing material?

http://www.pnr-vexin-francais.fr/fichier/pnr_document/74/document_fichier_fr_clotures.abords.pdf