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French Nationality

Posted by Nautuque-606978 - Created: 3 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by ler_ant - 3 years ago

Hi, I have recently gone through the process of applying for French nationality, however as a non eu citizen. I had to supply the birth certificate translated by a court approved translater as well as the birth certificate being apostilled in the country of origine and most important not being older than 3 months.

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 3 years ago

a3, what a lovely post, thank you.

Vannetais - I don't follow your logic - the average French person will know about as much about applying for French citizenship as I, as a Brit, know about the procedure for applying for British citizenship, ie next to nothing.

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Posted by Vannetais - 3 years ago

Would it not be more appropriate to ask this question on a French website, after all you are applying for French citizenship.

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Posted by Vannetais - 3 years ago

Would it not be more appropriate to ask this question on a French website, after all you are applying for French citizenship.

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Posted by a3 - 3 years ago

Jamesmb you sum it up nicely for me. In the same way i made a commitment to moh when we married so i want to demonstrate my commitment to France. I am here from choice with a feeling of affinity with the culture of the country in the fullest sense i.e political as well as art lterature etc. 

It is not a perfect country no country is but overall french society meets my aspirations of a society i want to live in and they deserve in allowing me to join them my public commitment to their society.

However i do understand why for Revuse it does not seem important they are integrated and do not feel a piece of paper important, their life is the demonstration of their commitment many a committed couple take the same view!

Orme2 i am also like you in considering voting a civic duty it is a hard earned right and it is important that those who have power are held to account by the societies they lead.

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Posted by littlefish-439129 - 3 years ago

Hi, in reply to Bella, please others don't criticise, everyone does their own thing, but, yes there is advantages, perhaps not extra dole  or social security money etc. Some would think not worth the hassle, me and my family have had nationality for a long time and the main reason was for my children who at the time were 'starting out' in adult life. These questions have been asked before ,here on AI, should you or you children wish to find work in government paid jobs, ie teaching, police, army etc they have to be nationals therefore looking to the future you/they may need it. Have had lots of in the past (exams at universities, paperwork from schools , mairies, doctors, hospitals etc) but now everything is much easier;.As for voting, can anyone anywhere after all these years in any country, actually say that anything 'changes' for the 'normal' working man? Here in France, perhaps you never know where laws pass so quickly unlike the UK, there may come a time when non nationals are taxed higher by one means or another because of the 'surge' of immigrants around europe. Personnally, one of the best reasons is when you are referred to as the 'anglais' and you can tell them that  (being self employed) you actually contribute more than them  to the government and in fact (depending on their age) I'm more french than them !!!! I do believe though if your life is here then why not ? The french do take better to people 'trying' to fit in much like UK residents would..

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Posted by jamesmb - 3 years ago

I'm another one that puts a lot of importance on voting and playing a part in the wider democratic process. To me, taking French nationality is the final act of 'buying in' to the society in which you live and formally saying who you identify with. It removes the last of the barriers and it is the final act of commitment. To me.

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Posted by orme2 - 3 years ago

There's no wrong type of person reveuse - just different types!  I don't really feel British either, and I've been away so long that I feel like a tourist if I go back there.  To be honest I feel more European than anything else.

I believe in staying together because of love too, but I'm Christian so being married makes my union sacred.  In the end, it's about how you feel and what works for you.

 

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 3 years ago

Thanks for that, orme. Yes I get it about the voting, that's the positive that I can see.

I'm still struggling to get it about the rest though. Part of the problem is that I don't 'feel' British. I have a French partner but I 've never felt particularly conscious that I'm a different nationality from him. All I'm conscious of is that my French is lacking on occasions - but it still would be, and I'm sure he'd still call me his petite anglaise even if officially I was French. And I'm afraid I don't set much store by marriage either - I believe in staying together for love, not because of legal obligations. Maybe I'm just the wrong type of person.

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Posted by orme2 - 3 years ago

reveuse, for me voting is incredibly important.  Not long ago, people couldn't vote and an even shorter time ago women were treated like children, or simple minded adults, who didn't have the ability to decide who should make the laws to which they are subject.  For me, I have a duty to vote, if only to show how grateful I am to those who fought and struggled so that I can do so.

Then, again to me, I love this country (and have done since my first visit when I'd just turned 15) and want to feel a real, entire part of it.  This 'piece of paper' is a tangible sign of that.  As I said in a previous post, it's a bit like the 'piece of paper' MOH and I got when we got married.

Maybe it's different for me.  My husband and son are French citizens.  I would feel strange if I didn't have the same nationality as those I love the most.