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Notaire Fees

Posted by Jussy-414312 - Created: 3 years ago
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7 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 7)

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Posted by Jussy-414312 - 3 years ago

Thank you everyone for their input, it seems like the fees are correct when you take into account the gouvernment fees etc. Always good just to double check.

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Posted by all4one-10057182 - 3 years ago

It is quite simple, in the French system the Buyer pays the bulk of the fees i.e. both Agency and  Notaire. The Seller pays for any Diagnostic./ Compliance Certificates and any costs related to private advertising should they go down that route.

Whilst Agency/Immobiliere fees may vary from business to business, Notaires fees are on a set Government scale according to selling price. If the property is bought through a Notaire apart from the legal fees there will be fees as part of the "selling/immobilier" process, these are usually less than those of a traditional Agence Immobilier,

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Posted by Kernowboy-10061199 - 3 years ago

Reveuse, in France the buyer pays all the fees, Notaires AND agency, unlike the UK where the seller pays the agency fees.  Of course there may be the odd occasion where by negotiation the seller might agree to pay the agency fees but it is definitely not the norm.

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Posted by Kanak - 3 years ago

if you saw the property advertised at the notaires, he will have been mandated as agent by the vendor, and if it is arranged that the buyer instead of the seller  pays the frais d'agence the notaire must tell you the cost, including TVA.   It seems strange (to english)  that the notaire can be the agent plus the acting solicitor for both parties.....  The conveyancing charges are by law on display in the office, and are degressive or inversely proportional to the price, but  when you think about it, there is probably as much office time in a conveyance at 20,000 as 2 million euros, so %s are a bit misleading.

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Posted by Lapin-436112 - 3 years ago

I am pretty sure that the 1200 euro is the negotiation fee and the 3100 are the fees for the act (gouverment etc) and is in this case about 15% of the sale price. Know tht notaires will always charge a little extra until they have the final bill and will then reimburse you the difference, we ha this happening in the past several times, its how it works it seems. Ask the notaire to explane the 3100 as normally it should be about 10% of the sales price. it might be that some amounts included in the fees are fixed (so no matter what the sale price is) this might be why yours is higher then normal for such a small price.

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Posted by Kernowboy-10061199 - 3 years ago

Did you see the house through an agent or through the Notaire?  The Notaire's fees are fixed, they are in effect, taxes charged when buying a house, rather like stamp duty in the UK, some of it goes to the Notaire for his services (conveyencing, if you like), the rest to the Government. The total is usually between 11% and 15%. The extra fees you mention are probably the "negotiation fees", some notaries charge next to nothing for that, others charge as much as the Immobiliers.  Ask for a break down. You can't negotiate the legal fees but you can certainly negotiate the negotiation fees.

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 3 years ago

Notaires fees are the main expense, not estate agent fees - in fact I thought the seller usually pays the estate agent fees and the buyer pays the notaire fees. You can get an accurate estimate of the notaire fees here http://www.pap.fr/argent/calculettes/frais-de-notaire - just put in the details of the property. 25 per cent could be about right. Of course it isn't all fees to the notaire as such, most of it is disbursements - land registry costs, searches etc.