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Repatriation deceased

Posted by stonedecroze - Created: 4 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by grannydot-403561 - 4 years ago

also which a lot of people don't know is that the Marie will also provide the death certificate translated into English. They may initially say no they can't, but if they ring the British consulate in Paris, they will tell them what the form number is, and you can get as many copies as they will need in the UK.

i know of two Marie's that have done this, because I had to get it done when a friends husband died, the UK insurance would not accept a french death certificate. strange I thought as he had died while resident in France. 

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Posted by stonedecroze - 4 years ago

Yes thanks Alpaca

I have learned alot and they are dealing it with it efficiently.

There are some implications regarding some embalming which are important for families to know I think

Anyway, my friends are full aware of everything now and much reassured.

Have a good weekend all

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Posted by Alpacas - 4 years ago

This at one time was my area of experetise. The funeral directors both in France and in the UK should have certificated member of staff who are fully conversant with the process.

Yes the coffin must have a consular seal over one of the closing down screws.

Under a normal death there is no reason why the body cannot be viewed at the destination end.

The body must be embalmed by a qualified embalmer who will issue a certificatre.

The funeral directors at both ends will arrange paperwork and transportation.

 

Leave it to them they know what they are doing.

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Posted by Fish24 - 4 years ago

Thank you, stonedecroze,  for letting us know how you are getting on!  It means a lot to people who take the time and trouble to answer even simple questions from experience and research in French. Hope things go relatively smoothly.

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Posted by stonedecroze - 4 years ago

Hi

After shoddy effort byUK  insurance company but superb effort on French side with UK Repatriation company the ball is rolling and now I have learned in detail about procedures for this circumstances

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Posted by janes-394036 - 4 years ago

Hi Stonedecroze

I think it should be possible to open the casket in the UK. As Fish says the body had to be embalmed and transported in a zinc lined coffin. But this is all removed when the casket gets to the UK as neither burial nor cremation can take place otherwise. In my case there was an autopsy carried out in the UK so i can't see why the body cannot be viewed.

The funeral directors, as I said, will do all the paperwork for you, so don't worry about it. It is quite complicated especially as there is a sequence in which authorisations have to be obtained and time limits on some of them which can make it difficult for the funeral directors to give you an exact time when the body will be transported. Ours were enormously good at explaining all this.

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Posted by Fish24 - 4 years ago

I seem to remember that the local Maire or someone may be required to place a seal on the coffin lid (for French cremation anyway) and provide a declaration from the Commune's point of departure, together with an official Death Certificate signed by the doctor or hospital (you can ask for 10 copies as the family will need them to claim many things in France (notaire insurance/bank/etc). but  the Funeral Directors will see to all this and it will take time.

For certain overseas transport of a coffin, the body is required to be embalmed and transported in a sealed zinc-lined coffin. Do enquire at the French Funeral Directors as the regulations, both in France and those persons receiving in the UK, by obligatory official FR and UK Funeral companies are strict.  Do get a devis before agreeing and signing so that the family know what will be involved.

My condoleances as it is a very stressful time.

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Posted by stonedecroze - 4 years ago

Thank you for taking the time to reply.

I just need to be clear on a few things as am helping the family and do not want to give them any incorrect information

I have spoken to their insurance company who say they will arrrange everything but I am the go between for them all between France and Uk and dont want to get anything wrong whilst trying to be gentle and supportive in the best manner.

I have to just clarify with the funeral director about opening the casket in Uk but am told it is not possible.

Many thanks again

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Posted by janes-394036 - 4 years ago

I had to help someone do this a year or so ago and, as bandy says, the French funeral director will organise everything for you including the mountain of paperwork required. The body and casket went by air in our case and the French funeral director liaised with the UK one regarding flight times. It was obviously a very difficult time for the family involved and the fact that the whole repatriation process was handled by the funeral directors was a big relief.

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Posted by bandy - 4 years ago

As briefly as possible, the funeral director in the UK should liaise with their counterpart in France, (possibly also using a specialist repatriation firm from the UK to deal with the formalities).

Between them the arrangements will be made to transport the deceased to the airport. Once in the UK the local funeral director will deal with everything for them. It is common to transfer the deceased to a coffin suitable for their choice of cremation or burial;

There shouldn't be any reason why the deceased cannot be viewed - depending of course on the circumstances of the death, etc.

Generally, if there is an insurance company involved, they will take over dealing with the repatriation, the funeral directors, etc.

Condolences.