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Rural gites

Posted by The Ryans - Created: 3 years ago
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3 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 3)

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Posted by Lapin-436112 - 3 years ago

Melou, it is a new rule and article....gites rural always had 71% abbatement until now it seems as it comes to an end. They also had exemption on tax habitation and fonciere...that is also now done!

if you still want to get these profits then you will need to get classified. a shame!

I am not registered as a gite rural even though we live in a zone rural. I have gites and I am AE (now micro entrepreneur). and I stil get the 71% abbatement...always have, without asking or anything.

Hope that does not change now! even though you have to think you wont pay taxes anyway unless you make a fortune with gites. if for example you have a turnover of 30k you get an abbatement of 50% you still dont pay income tax!

in fact as a couple you will need to make about 52k with gites to pay any income tax it seems! if you have children then even more then that! :)

 

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Posted by Melou - 3 years ago

I simply don't understand this article - this is not a change for 2016, it has been in force for some years, surely!

The historic 71% tax allowance used to apply to all owners declaring under the micro-bic régime on their tax returns. Then they changed the rules to try to force owners to register with their local tourist board, as a 'gites de France'. This means that you have to pay them a) to come and inspect your property, in order to identify a 'star' category, and b) make you pay an annual registration fee.

If - like us - you decide that it is not worth the expense and hassle, because the level of potential booking you will get from your tourist office is abysmal, but you have to comply with their Rules, keep them informed of all bookings etc., then you pay more tax (which in most circumstances is, on balance, less outlay). 

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Posted by kervéor - 3 years ago

I would say the local Chambre de Commerce is best to ask or an accountant