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Suggestions for a thriving new adventure in Brittany (Bretagne)

Posted by bustid-396267 - Created: 2 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by plouyepaul - 2 years ago

In an ideal world cookatreat and whatonearth2 have it about right. Here it comes - however, we do not. Everyone seems to have overlooked the fact that, as someone mentioned earlier, high streets aka small businesses are being squezzed out of the market, most likely aided by pressure on suppliers by the Corporates. We live in a Corpratocracy, no doubt. If you disagree then I must insist, with the greatest respect, that you are living in cloud cuckoo land. You really do need to wake up and smell the coffee!

To add my two-peneth in response to the original question and the pleading of many respondents, I would not consider roofing as a proffession particularly in 22 or 29, unless you work soley by and for yourself, two brothers for example would be an ideal way to do it, one perhaps specializing in carpentry and the other coverings, mainly slate of course.  I speak from experience as someone who has been employed as a roofer, I only sought the job and was snapped up, never even climbed a ladder before. Finding and keeping personel is nigh on impossible unless you can offer 50% more than SMIC as an hourly rate and then treat them with kid gloves. The job is diabolical, I originally signed on for 3 months in order to learn the skills necessary to do my own roof. I also helped a few friends renew their own rooves,so the skill was handy enough and I ended up sticking around for a further 8 months so he was chuffed but tried hard to keep me.

The moral of the story is that there will always be niche skills that can earn you a comfortable living for 'the foreseeable future' stupid expression, it's meaningless and jus means we don't know!

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Posted by whatonearth2 - 2 years ago

Choose what you want to do and make it work. Small business works just as well here as in the uk. There us always black work competition deal with it. Don't rely on British customers you will either have some or not. In my experience the french pay better and more willingly for my service anyway. Oh and like any forum you get all the bad bits of life folks rarely advertise the good news so you get the impression everyone is failing. That is just not the case most small businesses are doing well in relative degrees of sucess. You are 7 likely to findi something unique so just do what you can and aim to be the best

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 2 years ago

Cookatreat, yes if you register as a reseller you have a ceiling of 82 200€ and cotisations at 12.2 per cent, sorry I thought you'd mentioned artisan activities. You can see all the thresholds here for single and mixed activities  - scroll down to the table http://www.auto-entrepreneur.fr/activite/activite-mixte.html

There is, or was, a special subvention from the State for boulangers. At the last count we had 7 boulangeries in my town - and it's not a big town.

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Posted by Cookatreat - 2 years ago

Thanks for the info , if it's service only its the lower figure , if you buy something in and sell on for a much higher margin it's a higher figure I think ? 

There are smaller firms in France , but it is hard to compete when you take on employees and you are exposed to higher risks . 

'it seems bakers still make an OK living in brittany , but we all know that many small towns and villages are shutting down their high street , its the same in the uk , I was interested in anyone's ideas for trying to add atmosphere to small towns and offer any kind of living , even if it was small scale and small income?

 

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Posted by Papi-10068015 - 2 years ago

The ratio of public employment vs private employment is vastly different in France to what it is in Britain. If you take central government, local government and the huge range of agencies that make up the French public services system (far more than in Britain), it has been calculated that about 50% of the French workforce is in the public sector. Even their private sector has been breaking EU rules for years with public investment to prop up many private companies, eg Air France and Renault, to keep them competitive. Yes - certainly different.

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Posted by chèvrefeuille - 2 years ago

France is full of small firms with a handful of employees that thrive year in year out. It is untrue to state  that all French people want to be public employees. France, like England needs both sorts of workers and just because the French do not encourage self employed people who cannot earn even minimum wage it does not mean that their system is wrong; it's different that's all.

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 2 years ago

Looking back at your previous post Cookatreat - you mentioned 75000€ turnover but for artisan activities your turnover on micro is capped at around 32/33k, can't remember the exact figure. Above that you have to shift onto a different regime and start charging TVA.

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 2 years ago

On micro you pay (depending on activity) social charges at around 25 per cent of TURNOVER. That has been calculated to equate to about  the same as 45 per cent of PROFIT for the same type of business. Eg for profession libérale the calculation is based on an overheads:profit ratio of approx 30:70, so if you work out 25 per cent of 70 per cent, and 45 per cent of 100 per cent, it should come to not too far adrfit. 

 

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Posted by Cookatreat - 2 years ago

Thank you reveuse , that's a much bigger help , thank you , :) I understand that employing people is unfortunately a no go , not only with the extra charges but the risk of ongoing costs if the staff don't work out ,

but I was under the impression that if there was no staff , if it was self employed on the micro scheme for example , then then tax etc costs are set at 25% ?

i'm asking because I'm interested in helping start a couple of start ups for an artisan project as a means to adding to the community of a small town , 

 

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 2 years ago

Cookatreat, it's not the tax as in income tax that kills businesses. It's the social charges that have to be paid by the business owner, and also for employees if they're brave/foolish enough to take staff on. On average you can expect to pay social charges at around 40 per cent of profit on average, maybe more. Tax is a fleabite by comparison. The secret is choosing the business structure that suits your particular business model the best; being on the right regime can make the difference between surviving and not surviving, but for newcomers to France who are struggling to understand all the different options from scratch or relying on someone else to advise them, that's not an easy decision to make.