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Allinson Yeast & Bread Flour - Equivalent?

Posted by HarleyRider58 - Created: 3 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by Anonymous - 3 years ago


The numbers relate to how much gluten is in the flour. So Type 45 is typically used for pastries
and sauces, Type 55 is "standard" white baking flour - in French terms - used for baguettes and so on.
Type 65 is stronger still, and then there's 80, 110 and up to wholemeal 150.
However, there may be different grinds of flour (for example) that can still all be the same type,
just to make things a little more complex.

Most retail "bread" flours are blends of different flours, rather than being flour of a single numbered
 grade.

Type 65 is quite highly regulated and cannot have any added ingredients (such as ascorbic acid).
This is the flour boulangeries use for bread described as tradition.

Different countries treat their flour in different ways, so there is no direct equivalent of
UK or US "strong bread flour" (and each of those is different to the other), nor to
Italian 0 or 00, and so on - so you need to experiment and modify recipes as you go along.
If the flour is too strong you can always add a little starch (cornflour),
if not strong enough you can add gluten...

Type 45 flour is for pastries,
55 is used for white bread,
and types 65, 80, 110 and 150 are for various kinds of brown bread.
Clearly, the higher the type, the browner the bread.

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Posted by No longer Online - 3 years ago

you dont need to . i brought mine from kerbian farm shop they sell here in france  .

happy shopping

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Posted by Kanak - 3 years ago

spot-on, rider......   '65' is less milled.    In U.K. they always said years ago that Canadian flour was hardest,  I  used to assume because of the climate, but the French numbers are also something to do with the cinder content?,  which is also used in wine and other processes.  So, in short, if there is more husk, there could be more pesticide residues, which takes big suppliers out of the equation, but then I thought you could get 65 white, as opposed to 65 wholemeal, which brings me back to whether there is a different approach here to sowing grain for baking, as opposed to animal/general use, and maybe someone else can help, but I now feel justified in buying Allinsons VERY strong white flour in U.K. myself.

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Posted by Laura29 - 3 years ago

45 is self-raising, usually called Farine de Gateux, plain is Farine de Ble, 55 would be strong flour suitable for bread. Good Luck!

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Posted by Laura29 - 3 years ago

45 is self-raising, usually called Farine de Gateux, plain is Farine de Ble, 55 would be strong flour suitable for bread. Good Luck!

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Posted by HarleyRider58 - 3 years ago

Thanks Kanak!  That is valuable information....  my next question was going to be "equivalent of plain, strong, and extra strong flour.   So, 45 is plain; 55 is strong.   Do I assume there is a "65"???

 

Thanks again!

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Posted by Kanak - 3 years ago

Label Type 45 is general use flour,  Type 55 is stronger and may give you a better bread.  It should be written on the packet.  Some ready-mix flours are relatively expensive, but some supermarkets do have blocks of fresh yeast.  Or ask your boulanger, ours is happy to sell fresh yeast too!

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Posted by HarleyRider58 - 3 years ago

Great!  Thanks everyone!   I'll give Francine a try....

 

 

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Posted by brodeuse - 3 years ago

I get great results with Francine bread flour and yeast.

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Posted by Iguana Rock - 3 years ago

Often there is a wide choice available in garden centres too.