DISCUSSIONS

Find the answers to many of your expat questions here

View Latest Posts

You're missing out...

As a member you can enjoy exclusive info and offers.

REGISTER NOW

Chicken v Chickens.

Posted by sabc15-427548 - Created: 3 years ago
0 0
Sorry no image available

10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

Sorry no image available
Posted by AQ-417490 - 3 years ago

Whilst this is a slight wander from the original post, the subject is still related. Many will have seen this before, or other examples - but it is worth an airing here :-

  "Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe."

I still think spelling (and grammar in general) is important, but this piece demonstrates how flexible we can be in deciphering written text (have my doubts if it was spoken). 

However, does the same principle here apply to other languages ?  I need to check out  a French piece on a French person. Forget doing it in German, many of their words are so long that they would have no chance.

Sorry no image available
Posted by seashore-10052757 - 3 years ago

I wonder what sabc15's son's English teacher thinks about starting a sentence with a lower case letter or the word and?

Sorry no image available
Posted by Sempron - 3 years ago

and I thought KFC were breeding genetically modified chickens with 4 legs !!!!

Sorry no image available
Posted by aramanta - 3 years ago

And noone could disagree with sitting in the sun with a glass (or two) of wine!!

Sorry no image available
Posted by AQ-417490 - 3 years ago

I agree aramanta - filling in a form is what I would do, but I have been asked many times to fill out a form. The teaching of grammar went out of the window (or should that be through the window) back in the late 60s, but thankfully, I remember most of what I was taught up to that point. Whilst it might seem less important in respect of one's mother tongue, it comes to the fore when learning another language, as people can then identify their verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions etc to construct sentences correctly. However, grammar is often as poorly applied in fooreign languages as it is in English, which, in turn, can be confusing to those learning the foreign language.

I, too, think sabc15 has the right approach - as long as you learn enough to be able to communicate, we should not worry unduly, especially if no longer working for a living, where the need to get it right might be more crucial.

Sorry no image available
Posted by Older Punk - 3 years ago

It's the nature of languages to be flexible/irregular/rule breaking etc, and you speak your mother tongue more by intutition than by following the rules.

I was "corrected" a German English teacher once for spliting my infinitives, ("surely that is incorrect and not what we were taught"- and I quote). Two things- 1) I can split as many infinitives as I want thank you very much- it's my language and not yours. 2)- if you spent less time worrying about what is "correct" and was isn't, and less time looking for an obscure synonyn for a simple word to make yourself look clever you might speak English a bit more fluently and sound a little bit less like Herr Flick than you do. I might of said that of course, but being too polite didn't!!

Sorry no image available
Posted by Rudge - 3 years ago

I think sabc15 has the best approach to language !

Sorry no image available
Posted by sabc15-427548 - 3 years ago

After speaking English for 72yrs (apparently poorly) I don't have a cat in hell chance of managing French,think I will just reach for the red wine and sit in the sun.sabc15.

Sorry no image available
Posted by aramanta - 3 years ago

Doesn't fill in a form mean fill in the boxes? As in put some text into the boxes. Can't imagine saying fill out the boxes on a form. Fill out is yet another Americanism. 

And where to put apostrophes, its and it's, the difference between their and there  

I blame spellcheck.  Noone bothers learning grammar any more. 

Sorry no image available
Posted by AQ-417490 - 3 years ago

How about filling out a form, or filling in a form ? Or driving up to London versus driving down to London ?

Fortunately, English is a very flexible and forgiving language - it can be abused (and often is), yet still be understood, not that all the mis-uses we see should be accepted, especially by Americans, who believe they have been burglarised whilst us Brits know they mean burgled.