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Posted by rhys1 - Created: 3 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by Tryval - 3 years ago

Sorry, that should read,"Credit d' Impot".

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Posted by cherylann morris - 3 years ago

I have just recieved my new Godin Colonial from the lamaisonpoelebois.It took a little longer than expected but we are very happy with it.

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Posted by Tryval - 3 years ago

We have a 14kw Viillager, very happy with it, was installed by TK Construction (who are, sadly, apparently out of business!).

Only disadvantage was it did not qualify for a "cedit d' impot, which is significant when the installation is done by a pro'

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Posted by shorrcks - 3 years ago

AJ Wells on the isle of wight make all their stoves from steel & sell world wide. very good products.

as long as the pine is burnt with other wood it will burn as well as oak.  just burn it hot at least once a week

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Posted by JohnP-390097 - 3 years ago

If burning pine works for you, why not. My personal experience is that having a long chimney flue pipe(13 metres), unless the woodburner is really hot the resin from the pine condensates in the flue and runs back down as a black sticky tar. You have to go with what suits your burner. Maybe Scandinavian burners run hotter or 'second burn' better than English stoves.  Horses for courses I guess :)

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Posted by Fitter - 3 years ago

I'll second the support for pine - what do they burn in USA , Canada and Scandinavia? Imported French seasoned oak? Having had some douglas fir, spruce and northern pine taken down we have been burning a mixture of all these with oak, and I also second the tip about the heat output - especially from douglas fir - burns well and heats well. Never had a problem with the flues, always burn the stoves maximum hot for an hour a day to clean out the flues-and use the de-coking granules once a month.

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Posted by Karen-381938 - 3 years ago

I think the argument re burning pine will go on for a long time.

I can only say that our supplier/installer told us that pine is perfectly acceptable if it is well seasoned and your burner is suitable. In Scandinavia, pine is the main wood fuel as the countries are full of coniferous forests.

When the chimney was swept at the end of last winter our sweep said the flue was cleaner than it has ever been and this was the first winter we had burnt only pine.

As for calorific value, the whole house is warmer than it's ever been, certainly warmer than when we were burning hardwood on the old inset fire.

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Posted by JohnP-390097 - 3 years ago

I also have a Villager stove. I have had it for 10 years and it heats my whole house in the winter. It may be a little "old fashioned" looking but why change a design that is proven. I can recommend these woodburners, not cheap but built to last and efficient.

I would also be wary of burning pine, it contains a lot of resin which can condensate in the flue if you have a long chimney flue and runs back down the pipe as a thick black tar which smells awful and apart from being a possible fire hazard, makes an awful mess. A mixture of good seasoned wood I find works well. Oak is probably best because it is slow burning but expensive to buy and I don't think it gives out as much heat as other softer wood, that is why I prefer a mixture.

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Posted by vivaofsnape - 3 years ago

I would be very careful with burning pine, others don't use it for good reason. Pine, even when dry contains resin and this can condense leaving a tar build-up on the inside of the chimmey and this becomes a fire risk. The calorific value of pine is low compared to hardwood. 

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Posted by Karen-381938 - 3 years ago

I know what you mean about the style of some of them. The Scandinavian one we have is very sleek and modern and there are certaily some "modern" suppliers in the St Brieuc area.

You are definitely right in looking for personal experience of suppliers. You're dealing with a potentially dangerous item and you need tro be sure the item is up to the job and the installers know what they are doing.