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Insulation

Posted by izzyandclive - Created: 4 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by izzyandclive - 3 years ago

Thanks to all those who responded. Turns out our roof was not a simple "rollover" as we have about a metre and a bit of pure rafter at each eaves meaning that the insulation material in that area has to be injected. Thinking of the cold winter nights ahead in our currently G rated house we decided to go with one of the local highly regarded specialists..Dore Habitat. Their quote for the flat bit was compatable with others and we were swung by the recommendation of our French neighbour who has used them.

There was a little bonus under a scheme called Comparitif primes CEE we were able to claim E145 from Leclerc who are one of the companies funding a scheme to encourage homeowners to insulate their properties. We are planning to contact our Marie regarding possible grants but we were advised by Dore that apart from the tax credit further grants are unlikely. Once again many thanks to all.

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 4 years ago

Breeze, was that with ANAH? If so, was there a clause that says you have to pay the grant back in full if the house stops being your main home within 5 years? Maybe it's different from one region to another, but that was one of the things that put me off - not that I have plans to move at the moment, but nothing's set in stone. The other thing was that they would have insisted on ripping out the existing insulation of my attic studio and replacing it with insulation so thick that the studio would no longer have been useable. 

I agree it's a great scheme, and obviously they have their targets to meet, but it does mean that the decisions are taken out of your hands.

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Posted by Breeze-906262 - 4 years ago

I've just had my insulation done with a grant.  I got 70%.  I had double glazed windows, loft insulation, wall insulation and the ceiling to my sous sol insulated.  Huge difference in comfort!!!  I had to have a registered artisan.  They did a great job and it was well worth paying the 30%.  It was an unnecessarily lengthy process getting the go ahead with the person responsible for admin causing an immense bottleneck.  

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Posted by stephandsam - 4 years ago

If you're on low income it's worth knowing that  you can get blown loft insulation for 1 euro (and about 5 euro VAT), my neighbour did it  see http://www.pacte-energie-solidarite.com/

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Posted by AQ-417490 - 4 years ago

The usual method would be to lay rockwool or fibreglass wool across the loft floor, ideally to a depth of about 10 inches / 25 cm. It is, of course very common in parts of France (eg Normandy, Brittany and elsewhere) to have rooms in the roof space, with either Velux windows (sloping) or dormer windows. This would make it very difficult to install loft insulation, with limited ability to insert anything between the roof tiles / slates and the sloping ceiling beneath. Hopefully some insulation would have been installed when the loft rooms were created, but that is by no means certain. If the loft space is not providing any living space (perhaps just storage), then laying insulation on to the loft floor is not only much easier, but more effective, as the heat loss is halted at the floor loft rather than the roof so you are not heating the loft itself. It's a bit cheaper too, as the square footage of rockwool needed is less than for the two sloping roof sides.  The loft space does need some ventilation, especially as it will get much colder in winter and condensation can occur - but often there are plenty of gaps under tiles etc that do this, but if not, then ventilation grilles might need fitting under the soffits.  

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Posted by countrydweller - 4 years ago

Yes you probably can do it yourself cheaper but not eveyone wants to be grovelling round in the attic putting down fibreglass etc wearing a mask and overalls then itching all over for the next week because a bit got down the back of your shirt.Been there done that

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Posted by sophie hunton - 4 years ago

When you say insulating the loft do you mean on the floor of the loft or under the rafters?,if its the loft floor its far cheaper to do it yourself even if you do get a grant.

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Posted by Reveuse-918439 - 4 years ago

Depending on the type of grant - not only a registered tradesperson but has to be accredited to their particular scheme (not all are), insulation has to be very high performance (ie very thick, therefore potentially reducing your headroom significantly), the work has to improve the overall energy efficiency of the property by x per cent, your income has to be below a certain figure... If you happen to tick all the boxes you get a quality job done and you only pay a fraction of the cost yourself. But for that fraction of the cost, you could probably still get an OK job done without all the hassle of applying for grants and having to do things that you wouldn't necessarily have chosen to do.

Just my experience.

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Posted by AQ-417490 - 4 years ago

That's absolutely right. Whilst using a registered tradesperson might make a lot of sense for many tasks (boilers etc) where safety is the key issue, laying loft insulation is a simple task that most people can do themselves for just the cost of materials - so no grants available doing it that way. I have not seen any firms doing cavity wall insulation and many houses built right up to the 60's are single skin block walls - rendered on the outside. The RT regulations (Reglemente Thermique) that appeared some years later, started the drive towards improved insulation for all new builds, the latest being RT 2012, which specifies high levels of floor, wall and loft insulation. Double glazing has been standard for a number of years. 

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Posted by Anonymous - 4 years ago

Correct me if I'm wrong, but to qualify for the grant the work must be done by a registered tradesperson.  And for instance the grant is good for 50% of the cost of the job you will probably find that buying the materials yourself and fitting it will still be way less than the 50% you will have to pay after the grant.  If the trades were less expensive it might make more sense.