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Processionary Moth/Caterpillar

Posted by blotto - Created: 3 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by Lumbersexual-992851 - 3 years ago

I also consider removing the nests not only a complete waste of time as it is only a temporary fix but an unacceptable hazard to the Arborist employed. 

On the plus side there are many tree species with far greater amenity value than pines so removal and replantation is a positive move all round.

Jack

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Posted by Beekeeper-446653 - 3 years ago

By far the best way to control this pest is to remove the host tree, aka cut it down. It sounds very negative but I get asked lots of times a year on what should i do with this problem.

You can pay a fortune for a pest control person to remove the nests, but this is complete waste of money. Your better off removing the tree. Maritime pines are of little use in nature, yes they provide some seeds for chaffiches and other seed eaters but not a lot else for other birds. They make the soil underneath very acidic with their needles and they will constantly get re infected with the precessionary moth caterpillar.

Why so many communes bother to place sticky traps around the trunk is beyoned me, as its stilll not addressing the problem. Theres loads of different types of trees and shrubs that would replace and substitute  for the better, provide more pollen and nectar for insects, provide better closed canopys for nesting birds etc and look an awful lot better too.

Maritime pines have their place and its along the coast, take a drive along the brittany coast between Ploubalay and Erquy, its full of them but notable lacking visible precessionary moth caterpillar. This demonstrates why it should be on the coast, the moth dont to that well their due to the exposure and  salt in the air, but the trees do very well because of their needle like leaves are able to cope well.

Its an issue that will never go away until the problem is addressed properly!

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Posted by Le Motard - 3 years ago

yay for the traditional ground based method . . . and more fun than swaying about on the top of a ladder!!

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Posted by junkanoo - 3 years ago

Hi

I've just shot the one nest that I had in one of my pines to smithereens with my shotgun. No sign of the little creatures now. I've seen pictures on the net of lines of shooters in Majorca dealing with nests In the same way. The nest in my tree was a good 10 metres up. There was no way I could get at it to burn it.

Cheers

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Posted by Lumbersexual-992851 - 3 years ago

Removing the food source, the tree itself, is by far the best way to reduce the risk of contact with these creatures.

Jack

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Posted by Ivoire-444486 - 3 years ago

A large pine tree in our garden developed more and more patches of dying foliage and structures like large cotton wool balls in the branches. Our French neighbour warned that these were chenilles processionaires - dangerous to animal and human health! The tree was felled and the nests burned.

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Posted by blotto - 3 years ago

Thanks for all the advice......even the shooting option!  I've seen a trap that wraps around the trunk with a tube leading down into a large plastic bag, I will try a home-made effort and see how it goes.  Seems a very sensible way of capturing them and avoiding airborne hairs, then definitely burning the bag.

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Posted by convent girl-439588 - 3 years ago

We had a couple of nests a few years ago and with a ladder we used a blow torch, that soon got rid of the little dears, be careful though, don't set fire to anything else by mistake!

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Posted by Tilia - 3 years ago

Pacco....do the safe thing and call a tree surgeon. At a they are insured and have the right equipment.

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Posted by Le Motard - 3 years ago

Been chatting about this post with my significant other . . . I know - such an exciting life!!! She confirmed my hazy memory of the local French shooting these things out of the trees with shotguns - the nests rather rather than the individual caterpillars . . . . maybe if you have a gun or one of your neighbours does you could try that . . . I know it sounds mad but I think the idea came from Spain where these things came from and where the Govt subsidised the cartridges to do the job . . . best of luck . . .