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Paying tax

Posted by Jeni-780887 - Created: 15 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by Stargazer-780995 - 15 years ago

If only !  Isn't that nearly always the way ?

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Posted by Jeni-780887 - 15 years ago

She should charge them interest!!!! :o)Jeni

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Posted by Stargazer-780995 - 15 years ago

No worries Nick, thanks for the reply. 

 Individual circumstances do vary. If too much tax has been paid one can always apply for a refund of any overpayments.....if one doesn't mind waiting! A French friend has been waiting almost 2 years since she left employment in the UK!

Regards

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Posted by Nick Warner-780931 - 15 years ago

Hi Stargazer - I didn't mean to say you had mislead anyone - sorry if you took it that way, my point was that my professional connection in UK was under the impression that if I worked in UK and paid tax there that I didn't need to declare that in France due to the double tax arrangement - wrong - the French tax authorities take into account worldwide income and want to know about it even if they cannot 'get 'you for tax here.Nick

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Posted by Stargazer-780995 - 15 years ago

Thanks Jeni,

All the best for a happy and peaceful move here!

Regards.

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Posted by Jeni-780887 - 15 years ago

Thanks Stargazer you haven't mislead me! I will seek professional advice when we arrive and make sure it is all sorted out correctly.

Thanks again

Jeni

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Posted by Stargazer-780995 - 15 years ago

Hello, apologies if I confused anyone with the simplicity of my posting.

I didn't/haven't fallen into any "trap".

We sought advice from the Inland Revenue in the UK and the British Consulate here.

I moved here ahead of my partner, for various reasons, one of them being that his job here was put back a couple of months. He remained in England, at his job for that time.

Therefore, his main residence was the UK, his work was in the UK and he was being paid in the UK, he paid his income tax NI contributions etc in the usual way.

If his was registered here, as his main residence and continued to work in the UK, it would've been a different matter, he would've had to declare any earnings through the French authorities. He came here to visit during his shifts off work.

We are both now officially registed (with the French and UK authorities) as living here, my partner  now works here, gets a monthly wage and pays his taxes and all contributions.

Nick, forgive me if I've mis-understood you, but as you say, you lived in France and worked in the UK, a different set up to ours, you may well have fallen into some kind of trap.

Jeni, I hope I haven't mis-lead you in any way. Also, I hope you are not too worried about anything. You only need to speak to the IR in the UK etc.

Anyone reading these postings should only take them as a guide line, to collect other ideas/points of view. We should always seek profresional guidance.

Regards.

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Posted by Nick Warner-780931 - 15 years ago

I lived in France and worked in the UK for 4 years and fell into the same trap as Stargazer has done, Gerbil is correct, you must register yourself in the French tax system (and pay your cotisations) if you live here.  Any tax you pay in the UK will be offset against any potential French tax (UK and France have a Double taxation agreement).

I strongly recommend you take professional advice - my French (english speaking) accountants are absolutely brillient and well worth their (very reasonable) fees.

Nick at Wellesley House Surveying

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Posted by gerbil-780940 - 15 years ago

It is very complicated. You both need to see an accountant/french tax specialist.My understanding is he would be deemed to be resident in France if at least one of the following is true: (a) his main residence is in France (if his spouse and children live in France then he would be considered to be french tax resident) (b) his principal residence is in France - i.e. he spends more than 183 days a year in France (c) his principal activity is in France(d) France is his centre of economic interest - where most substantial assets are.It sounds as though (a) and possibly (b) might be true so you would both be liable to pay tax (not forgetting social security, etc) in France. He would be able to claim back payments made in UK.Even if he stays out of France and only visits for holidays you would have to declare your worldwide income in France and he could still need to declare his income (even if he pays tax in the UK) so overall tax liability can be calculated. It would depend on how the french tax office treat your marriage regime as to the method of calculation. There is no separate husband and wife taxation in France; it is done by household.There is also health care for you to consider. As a resident in France you are obliged to join the french health system and to make contributions where applicable.I wouldn't leave it to chance. Seek professional advice.

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Posted by Stargazer-780995 - 15 years ago

Hello,

Do you mean tax on income? He'll have to declare it and pay it wherever he works. If he is only working and earning in Britain he only has to pay in Britain. If he's self-employed he can transfer and register the business here (France) if he wants to work here.

The Inland Revenue site has a mountain of info http://www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk/

Regards.