DISCUSSIONS

Find the answers to many of your expat questions here

View Latest Posts

You're missing out...

As a member you can enjoy exclusive info and offers.

REGISTER NOW

Letter from Saur

Posted by chicken-787052 - Created: 12 years ago
0 0
Sorry no image available

10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

Sorry no image available
Posted by Causette-780879 - 12 years ago

Kels, the SAUR are the water authority so are obviously going to err on the side of caution. I would say 'up to 10 years', rahter than 10 years. Much depends on hwo many are in the household, whether you treat your fosse with respect (!), whether it is a maison principale or holiday home etc.

JudyM (Nr Lisieux, 14)

Sorry no image available
Posted by kels-784678 - 12 years ago

Had man from Saur today at my other house which is maison principle and he was lovely, very helpful and gave us the thumbs up, which i thought he would, but do we get a letter to say all ok!!

Also i showed him the paper of when we last had it emptied and he said every 5 yrs to be done, whereas the people that emptied it said every 10yrs, so do i take it from Saur of the Poo suckers!!

Thanks again!!

Kelsxx

Sorry no image available
Posted by kels-784678 - 12 years ago

I have a property in Orne and it was SAUR that inspected to give me the certificate of conformitee??

But the house is on the borders of 61 and 14 nr to Vimoutiers!!

Kelsxx

Sorry no image available
Posted by Sarah Jane-787215 - 12 years ago

SAUR in Calvados, VEOLIA in Orne, don't know about Manche, --- local trading names for the water company!Jane

Sorry no image available
Posted by jane-780853 - 12 years ago

SAUR wrote to us asking for access, which we organized during december, but it was just to see the meter. the chap wrote down the numbers and my husband signed the form.jane

Sorry no image available
Posted by chicken-787052 - 12 years ago

Perhaps I was a little blase with my last post. I am more than happy for them to inspect my fosse a toutes eau, however they are writing to someone who has nothing to do with the ownership of my property and I don't get the letter in time to do anything about it. I have written to them to explain the correct contact that they should be approaching, and also gave them dates of when I would be available to give them access. As I'm only there 4-5 weeks of the year I thought this would be most helpful and perfectly reasonable.

Woudn't it be nice to get connected to mains though, not likely but would be nice!

Chicken
Manche 50

Sorry no image available
Posted by Causette-780879 - 12 years ago

Interesting comments on this thread - mostly saying the same thing. If I can just clarify my earlier posting (which I kept brief as I was at work!), the aim of this EU Regulation that eventually all households should be capable of being connected to mains drainage. (My italics) Well, we all know that for much of rural France, this is a pipe dream - imagine then, areas of Greece, or the eastern European countries - Bulgaria, Romania - this is way out of their reach. But nevertheless it is the law and we can't cherry pick the bits we like! (there is a faint whiff of the 'chuck the parking fines in the bin' on this thread!).

When you come to sell your house, you must declare the current drainage system. If there is an outstanding controle (and the rest of the commune has been done), how would this look to a potential buyer?

JudyM (Nr Lisieux, 14)

Sorry no image available
Posted by RAY THE BASS - 12 years ago

Thanks for your comment CJB.

It was a technician from SAUR that came to inspect our system Chris. It may well have been organised by our local commune though. At our meeting it was stated that three local communes had set up the SPANC but that SAUR were the body authorised to carry out the inspections. I suppose that it is of little relevance who sets up or organises the inspections as long as they are carried out responsibly and everybody's waste disposal system complies.

There are many issues in our 'Seen to be green' culture but I do feel that basic waste disposal and re-cycling should be one of several fundamental corner stones of our survival. It's not really 'rocket science' and straight forward, common sense solutions seem to me to be obvious!

Ray (1970 Fender Jazz) The Bass

Sorry no image available
Posted by chrisW-782156 - 12 years ago

Being out, is not a good idea. If your property's waste water is not polluting the groundwater then you will have no problem with a visit anyway.

As in the UK, if your property is causing a danger or a nuisance, and you are unavailable or do not answer letters etc. the CdC / local authority will carry out any necessary work and send you the bill or put a charge against the property when it is sold.

The older systems were OK in their time, as most houses grey water discharge was small and contained mainly food waste and soap, which breaks down naturally very quickly. It was therfore only necessary to deal with the toilet waste to avoid contaminating one's drinking water.

It is the use of water hungry kitchen/laundry appliances and the greater use of detergents and cleaning agents, together with an increased awareness of the envionmental damage they cause, which has made these Europewide regulations necessary.

SAUR = Société d’Aménagement Urbain et Rural. They are a water company but do include waste treatment plants in their business. It is probable that they are doing a feasablity study for collective treatment in your commune and that is why they called.

SPANC = Service Public d’Assainissement Non Collectif. It is a technician from this mob who will tell you if your waste treatment installation is not up to the job, and what work you will need to do (if any). You will have to pay them, normally directly, but if your commune pays it would go on your Taxes foncier / habitation anyway.

Chris Watts
50450 Montaigu-les-Bois

Sorry no image available
Posted by cjb-785070 - 12 years ago

Well said Mr. Bass Man. Ps - Saur is my water co. & spanc the inspectors.