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carte de sejour and employment

Posted by ludovic-189316 - Created: 14 years ago
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hello everyone... i have a question regarding the carte de sejour. what is its relation to being able to work? some places say that a carte de sejour is needed to be hired; others say that when applying for a carte de sejour one needs to take along proof of employment. but how can one be employed without the carte de sejour?

the situation is that I am American and my wife is French. She is going to back to France and I would of course like to go-- but I obviously don't have a job waiting for me there, nor do I have quite the "means of support" that they ask for ($3,500 a month-!). I'll not be arriving penniless-- I'll need to work soon after.

Any advice about the carte, etc?

thanks, ludo.

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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by szozu - 14 years ago

You do not need a visa before going (though that might depend upon your nationality, I'm not sure), and your local consulate will confirm this. Do make sure however, that your entry date is clearly marked on your passport. That's what's used as your visa when you apply.

If you are shipping any furniture or other things of that nature, you must visit the consulate first to get an official document for customs. Otherwise you will have expensive problems.

As far as all the technicalities about whether it's a Carte de Séjour, Titre de Séjour or Carte de Résident. The card I got after one year of a Carte de Séjour reads: Titre de Séjour and underneath it says Carte de Résident and is good for ten years--unless I decide to seek French nationality, which I am now eligible to apply for.

If your wife is in the social security system, all she needs is to call them to find out how to get you on her Carte Vitale, you do not need other insurance--at least I didn't! You will then be given a list of places where you can go to enter her card into a machine to update the information on it.

I don't know if you speak French, but here are a couple of good sites:
http://sos-net.eu.org/
http://vosdroits.service-public.fr/ARBO/08-NX08.html

Lana

 

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Posted by pjderra - 14 years ago

Okay, so now I'd like to know what is the difference between a titre de séjour and a carte de resident. And why would one chose to have one over the other if one is married to a french national?

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Posted by mike-179830 - 14 years ago

Read the AngloINFO INFOrmation page mentioned earlier: http://riviera.angloinfo.com/information/1/cds.asp. Highlights:

You still need a Carte de SéjourAs the spouse of a French citizen you do not need a long stay visaAs the spouse of a French citizen you automatically qualify for a titre de séjour, so will not need to prove funds etc.

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Posted by ludovic-189316 - 14 years ago

Thanks so much! I am still a little bit confused-- some of the replies indicate that a carte de sejour is still required, but i guess this isn't so--? then another reply mentions "During my process, I had to show that I was insured. Google "expatriate health insurance" "-- but it doesn't mention if this is for the carte de sejour or the residence-- but if residence entitles to French insurance, why would it be necessary--?

What sort of questions are in the interview? And sorry to nag on the point about "proof of adequate funds", but is that only for the carte de sejour and NOT the residence?

Oh... also-- i assume then it's not needed to get a long stay visa before going?

thanks so much!

ludo

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Posted by lynnettejane - 14 years ago

Hi all, you know I've read this before about having to have bills to prove residency  so that you can't get a bank account in France. We must have been very fortunate as we were given an account with no fuss, just passport, other ID, proof of marriage, and a UK utilities bill to prove our address here, we are with Banque Populaire Cote D'Azur. But there are branches of foreign banks there, we contacted Barclays  over there via the internet, they were willing to open an  account as long as we provided the above documentation. We went with BP simply because there was a local branch  which would obviously be more convenient, regards Lynnette

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Posted by C J Flynn - 14 years ago

One presumes you have read:http://riviera.angloinfo.com/information/1/cds.aspWe applied for the Livret de famille while we were still in the states at the french embassy in Los Angeles. Theoretically, it is required to be done within 6 months of the marriage, or something like that. If you aren't leaving immediately, this is something that you can do to get your process started, working with people who deal with americans and french ex-pats all the time. (But make sure to give a relative's address for a mailing address in case you move before the process is complete. This is what happened in our case.)As the Livret has much the same substantiation requirements, it served me well here, adding a legitimacy to my process. One glance at it was all the agent at the Nice Prefecture needed to substantiate the marriage and other papers. Regardless, remember, you are nothing and nobody until you get a phone bill and/or an electricity bill. It establishes that you are actually living here. I found that no matter how I tried to bypass that part of the system- to get the bill sent early- no matter how many people said that they would personnally send the bill or statement in advance, I might as well have spent the energy getting a tan. Without that bill, you can't really get a bank account, a non-carte mobile phone, or other things. (Discretely flashing the EDF bill is actually the way to get service in restuarants, a fact seldom disclosed. This makes up for the frustration of the primary Catch-22; that you can't rent a place or apply for a phone or EDF service without a previous bill.)We found the most helpful people are the people at the France Telecom Phone company stores in the shopping centers (for example, at Nice Etoile.) You will wait in line to get service, but once a person is helping you, they will take all the time you need to get the paperwork going and answer all your questions. Don't forget to have plenty of photos with you. 3 are required, but bring 4 or 8...you'll need them all eventually. They are cheap and you can get them at the photo shops at the Carrefours, or other places. During my process, I had to show that I was insured. Google "expatriate health insurance" As the Prefecture agent was stamping things complete, he said that I would get something in the mail sending me to a medical exam, which happened. I went, they shot the X-ray, I was routed to a nurse who asked the questions and told me the secret codes, then she routed me to the doctor who looked at the X-Ray and accepted the secret codes. There was no charge for this service.Then a short wait for the local village to send me a slip of paper telling me to pick up the magic Carte de Sejour. The card actually doesn't say Carte de Sejour, it says Titre de Sejour. It has been a helpful piece of identity for banking and setting up an SARL.On the other hand, I know people who have come here on contract for american companies and stayed for a couple years without getting french papers, with the corporation leasing cars and renting offices with impunity. Not that anyone living here now would do anything like that.But consider. Getting this card has established the date of my one year anniversary, (probably relevent for tax reasons), but more important, it determines when I have to know enough french to apply for the driver's license. Alors! Two months to learn between droit and ... what was that other one?Bon chance, C J Flynncharles@internetmarine.net

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Posted by pjderra - 14 years ago

Maybe it was the case for me because I never had a carte de sejour......I applied directly for the carte de resident. So I didn't enter the French system until had it - thus no medical records for me prior to this. Anyway I know things can differ according to who you see on the day with regards to the Prefecture.......... Strange but true. example - in applying for my french drivers licence, in advance I was told it would be complicated and to bring a virtual briefcase full of translated documents which I obediently provided. Then all I was asked for on the day was my Australian licence and my carte de resident. But I'm sure had I gone without all the other documents I would have been asked for them.Never can tell.......

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Posted by szozu - 14 years ago

pjderraThere's a medical check for the Carte de Resident as well..........

Really? I only had one for the Carte de Sejour. And it doesn't make much sense to me, as all they would need to do is check my medical records through the Social Security system to discover any medical problems I might have.

Lana

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Posted by pjderra - 14 years ago

There's a medical check for the Carte de Resident as well..........

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Posted by szozu - 14 years ago

My experience was similar except for the part about having to get things translated. My birth certificate was already in six languages and I was married in France, so the paperwork aspect was much easier. The prefecture is a drag. If you accept that right off the bat, you won't get too frustrated, but once you get the temporary card, it allows you to work straight away. After a year's time you will get (after going through all the bullcrap at the prefecture again) a nice plastified card that says "Carte de Resident." You can then apply for French nationality if you like. I think that takes about a year. If you are on your wife's social security card, you can apply for your own Carte Vitale, which makes it easier when you go to the doctor, pharmacy, etc. They ask for a copy of your birth certificate and there's a form to fill out.

Oh yes, there's a medical exam and a chest x-ray involved for the Carte de Sejour.

Lana