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tax in france as a writer or similar profession?

Posted by sarahjack - Created: 15 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by sarahjack - 15 years ago

For any other writers: There's a french website: www.portaildulivre.com which is a website for writers in france (in french) and has lots of stuff on it including info on ' l'ecrivain, le fisc et la secu.' i'm ploughing my way through it all - i would say it makes interesting reading.....

but it certainly is enlightening if only to know how complicated this area is!

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Posted by Myop - 15 years ago

On Bill06's "last one". That is merely theory. In practice it doesn't work like that at all and certainly not through a UK company which is deemed to have the same fiscal responsibilities (and rights) as a French one trading in France. Try telling the Brits who have just been hit (big time, including imprisonment) in Britanny on their UK companies.

Mike got it spot on. He has obviously researched the matter.

I can't count the number of times someone has taken "expert" advice on things like this and then thought to themselves "it works!". Well, it only works until the fisc decides it's time to take a closer look. Then the proverbial you-know-what usually hits the fan in a big way.

Try telling those who have been "controlé" (sometimes after years of using a UK company as a front) only to find their bank accounts blocked and their property on auction.

If you make known a French phone number (including mobile) as a professional phone number (on letterhead, website, business card etc) you will probably be hit sooner or later if that number is used for much of the year (easy to check). Same for a French postal address or website.

The fisc doesn't care if you're living/working for 90 days a year in the UK. He cares whether you're living/working in France. It's always possible to "get away with it" for a while. But the "for a while" eventually runs out in many cases.

Don't ask me to tell you the sob stories (including my own) I've seen. It would ruin your weekend.

BTW: funny how the "EU tax experts" just vanish into thin air once the fisc gets his claws out.



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Posted by Bill06 - 15 years ago

Last one from me;

Tony I think is referring to a job posting with his UK based company in France.As the company is based in the UK he pays his NI there and his tax here.

If our writer only wrote her articles in the UK she pays no tax and of course no NI in France.Or as Tony points out,Form a company in the UK with her as an employee,paying UK NI and entitled to E106 etc,the company then post her to France where she works for the British company and pays income tax in France which as we know is generally less than the UK unless you earn over 150000 euros.

Result no beaurocratic nightmares with the french NI.Only 10 to 15% impots.

Ciao Bill

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Posted by mike-179830 - 15 years ago

>sigh<

But the self-employed writer does not have that option.

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Mike

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Posted by TonyP-191937 - 15 years ago

If a writer is resident in France, and does the work in France, they are actually better off paying French tax, since French tax is about the lowest in Europe.

If they are working for a UK co, they would be better off continuing to pay UK NI, thus gaining relief from the French NI, which is about the highest in Europe.

There is nothing illegal or dishonest about that.  The scheme is designed to protect the pension and unemployment rights of people who are detached to another country for a year or two.

Tony

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Posted by mike-179830 - 15 years ago

Bill06: I pointed out that if any of the work was performed in France it would constitute fraud. And it would. You have just agreed with me and then said I was writing rubbish.

There are many people - British and others - who are considerably poor (or even eating government-supplied food) for attempting to exploit loopholes that didn't actually apply to their particular circumstances.

And the plain fact of the matter is that, if you are resident in France you must satisfy the requirements of the French tax authorities. If you are able to do so while paying tax elsewhere for work performed elsewhere, fine. However, if you are working in France you will have no legal choice but to pay up.

And that's what this thread is about - the absence of a "better option" for someone working in and living in France.

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Mike

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Posted by Bill06 - 15 years ago

Mike

If tigger can prove the work is carried out in The UK fine.Most jobs have an element of thought and it is therefore reasonable to think about ones work in leasure time.Fraud is a load of rubbish.Avoidance is the word you are looking for.

Why surrender so easily.Some of us are British on this Forum,and considerably wealthy as a result exploring loopholes.

Bill 

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Posted by sarahjack - 15 years ago

Well! In my case i am definitely self-employed.  i could have a number of publishers in various countries even though the original publisher is in the uk.  i'm not trying to get out of paying anything - i do want to live in france and feel i should contribute.  my problem is currently my income is small and i had heard the contributions were fixed no matter the size of income so i was concerned about that.. 

no - sadly i'm not j k rowling - i wouldn't mind her tax dilemmas!! 

still not sure what i need to do!  but i'm working on it!!....

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Posted by Bill06 - 15 years ago

As I said before providing you spend less than 90 days in the UK each year you will qualify for non resident status and will need specialist advice in the UK to lessen your tax. You are quite entitled to an E 106 until you retire providing you pay NI in the UK.What you will not get is superior state pension and unemployment benefits in France.

Bill

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Posted by mike-179830 - 15 years ago

quote:The answere could then be very simple if rather than a self employed freelance you were employed by a company in the UK,with your desk there.

Assuming all the work was done at that desk. Otherwise it would be a little thing we call "fraud".

 

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Mike