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British journalist seeks Expat feedback

Posted by Rob Hyde - Created: 14 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by stgeorge-182529 - 14 years ago

Never talk to the Press - they're a menace ! What 'the butler' saw still remains frivolous as it was at the turn of the century ! Lady Docker told me that if I was seen anywhere near a Daily ......... journalist , I'd be fired on the spot , and Lord Tredegar took the press ( Express) to court and obtained an apology in print !

This may appear to be irrelevant to the original posting at first glance , but there are approx. 20,000 people on PACA associated or working in the yachting industry - which is and should remain low profile i.e. tell the Press nothing ( except Adrian Morgan ) !

stgeorge

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Posted by Zeynep-183200 - 14 years ago

Alivi, (an ethnic Turkish minority) ...

<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 

It is "ALEVI", not "Alivi". The least you can do is to spell it right, for God's sake.

 

And it is NOT an "ethnic Turkish minority". It is one of the major sects of Islam. 

 

Basically, "Alevi" (i.e. "follower of Ali") is the word in Turkish for "Shiite".

 

That is news to you, I bet. That is very sad, for you are the journalist who has supposedly researched this subject.

 

Any suggestion that all Turkish expats treat Alivi expats like this – or that a Turk and an Alivi will automatically dislike each other,  is both ridiculous, offensive and plain wrong to both Turks and Alivis alike.

 

Well, that assertion IS ridiculous, because Alevis ARE Turks.

 

The tension you described between this Alevi Turk and his employer must have originated from the employer's own religious background, rather than an animosity between expats you are trying to fit it into.

 

Regards,

Zeynep

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Posted by Rob Hyde - 14 years ago

Dear Zeynep, <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 

Thank you for your response. I have tried to reply to it although I’m afraid I have had to cut and paste a fair bit from other replies.

 

The point of article, (as written in crystal clear terms as a reply to some of the postings), is not to try and collect material proving that all expats hate each other and cannot get on with each other.

 

It is to represent both those that have and have not experienced this, and those which do and which do not feel that this is an issue.  Therefore, the views of those which DO NOT find that this is an issue, are just as relevant as those that do. The original posting therefore deliberately used the words:

“I am looking for feedback from any expats who have witnessed this or have views on this”

 

 

 

As many of the responses show, there are many expats who have no problem getting on with each other. Moreover they feel that living as expats and associating with the expat community, gives them a deeper, enriching insight into other cultures than they might not acquire were they simply living in their home country.

 

Therefore, to the many expats who are equipped with these noble notions of tolerance, acceptance and goodwill, the suggestion that any expats are not tolerant or accepting of others, could well seem inaccurate, offensive or ludicrous

 

 (Having been raised in England by an English family with strong Irish roots and living within a community of Irish expatriates, spending teenage years split between Brittany, France and Germany, and lived on and off in England, Austria and Germany, and living now as an expat, again, in Germany, I also feel that this enriching, wonderful experience means I have a profound tolerance for people of different nationalities).

 

I wouldn’t claim to know a nationality but I would claim to know some foreign nationals and to find their stories interesting and relevant – whether they have or have not experienced inter-expat tension (I have met and interviewed people from both camps). I think one can only do their bit, which is to live in these countries, with the people, study the language / culture, take up work their and interact in good faith and with an open mind with whoever possible. 

 

Like you seem to, I take great offence when people attempt to claim that a whole a  nationality is represented by individuals. My only issues with you is that I do not do this and did not do this in the posting you read.

 

Moreover, although you quoted from this posting to express how you had taken offence –  in the very same posting were these words:

 

“….Obviously it is inaccurate, and plain wrong and offensive  to suggest that if you are Turkish or Kurdish, or English and Irish, you are automatically going feel hostile towards each other, but I think it is just as inaccurate, wrong and offensive not to report on what has happened to many expats. The article is not being written with a view to trying to slam one nation and promote the other, rather to look at what sorts of tension have occurred, what the causes might be, and then look at ways round it.”

 

You clearly do not feel that inter-expat tension is an issue – and good for you. This is your view and you are an expat and therefore it is right that this view is represented and the story told.

 

In exactly the same way, those which do feel it exists, must and will have their views expressed and story told (like an Alivi I have met in person and interviewed, 28 year old Hakan Yilmaz who lives in Berlin).

 

No journalist should be prepared to ignore or to choose not to report on what is happening, even if it causes offence to others – and anyone else who expects this therefore is ultimately asking for a false, biased article. Those who do NOT feel inter-expat tensions exist in some form (and who are prepared to put their full name next to their quotes) must and will have their views expressed and story told. In exactly the same way, those which do feel it exists, must and will have their views expressed and story told (like Hakan Yilmaz).

 

Another point – you have not raised this but others did – if you are confused by the use of an expat forum for research – pls read other replies I have given to other expats.

 

In conclusion, I found your views interesting and relevant, and would be delighted to look at them further - views from ALL sides of the spectrum should appearin an article - with equal weighting on both. I am afraid, however, I would not yet consider any of the replies posted on this site as material as no one has yet given their full name and details which is the basic the minimum before one can even start to further investigate their story and consider it as material.

 

So far everything else is just names from an internet user.  They might all be true – they certainly seem to represent strong feelings, but ultimately as yet they are just first names of people I don’t know from Adam.

 

If there are more points please do get in touch again, and I will do my best to reply ASAP. I’m afraid, however, I am going to have to now start the majority of my time and energy to those who are serious about standing by the views they claim to feel strongly about, and who are serious about joining the debate (even if it is a controversial issue) instead of criticising those who would raise it. 

 

Best

 

Rob Hyde.

 

(Ends)

 

--
Rob Hyde
BA:German/French
PGCJ:Periodical Journalism
Telephone: +49 (0)173 186 1164
Web: http://www.robhydeglobal.com

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Posted by Rob Hyde - 14 years ago

Dear Lob,

Thank you for your response. I got the impression that you, like other people who posted responses, take offence that a request for expat feedback (neutral term for two sides of the spectrum) was posted in an expat forum, and that you deem this to be easy, cheap and therefore unworthy research. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 

It would indeed by cheap, unworthy research if material was only compiled this way (via internet). I think the ‘dodgy dossier’ story highlights this, and rightly so.

 

Posting a request for Expat feedbvack in an Expat forum, however, is not research. This is an attempt to find / get in touch with people, so that contact can then be made, preferably in person, with a view to hearing their case and considering as material.

 

Via the internet I found the Anglo / Stuttgart English-speaking social club for expats. I posted a request. I ended up later in touch with the head, Derek Evans, who told me his story. I listened to it, and wanted to investigate it further. He gave his home number, which could then be checked next to an address via yellow pages, moreover, he gave a place of work, and an email address so that it can then be established whether he works there or not.

 

Other details such as age, place of origin, amount of time living in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Germany all mean that a source can be verified. We have now conducted a successful telephone interview. (As it happens, he does NOT feel that inter-expat tension is an issue, he is an expat, this is his view, and therefore it is relevant).

 

If you look at other expat websites, such as www.britishexpats.com you will see that it is common place practice / methodology for media to do this. At the time of writing, the latest post on their site reads:

 

“Get a New life BBC Programme

Have you recently ‘Got a New Life’ in Europe?
Have you and your family/ friends been through the rough and the smooth of
relocation to Europe?
'Get a New Life’, BBC2 are looking for a UK family, currently living in Europe to show the realities of relocation.
If you fit the bill, please email
samw@brighter.co.uk

Another example - www.expatfocus.com also operates a media-friendly company policy. Its ‘article writing’ section reads:

“We are always interested in entertaining or informative articles which would be enjoyed by our expat readership. If you would like to write such an article we would be happy to post it to the Expat Focus site and include a link back to your site and/or your contact information. “

I would not consider one of replies posted on this site as material as no one has yet given their full name and details which is the basic the minimum before one can even start to further investigate their story and consider it as material.

 

So far everything else is just names from an internet user.  They might all be true – they certainly seem to represent strong feelings, but ultimately as yet they are just first names of people I don’t know from Adam.

 

(Ends)

--
Rob Hyde
BA:German/French
PGCJ:Periodical Journalism
Telephone: +49 (0)173 186 1164
Web: http://www.robhydeglobal.com

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Posted by Rob Hyde - 14 years ago

Dear Monaco Max, 

<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 

 

Thank you  for your response.  I've tried responding to what you put, although I'm afraid I am going to have to cut and paste a lot of what I have replied to others.

 

I got the impression that you, like other people who posted responses, take offence that a request for expat feedback (neutral term for two sides of the spectrum) was posted in an expat forum, and that you deem this to be easy, cheap and therefore unworthy research.

 

It would indeed by cheap, unworthy research if material was only compiled this way (via internet). I think the ‘dodgy dossier’ story highlights this, and rightly so.

 

Posting a request for Expat feedbvack in an Expat forum, however, is not research. This is an attempt to find / get in touch with people, so that contact can then be made, preferably in person, with a view to hearing their case and considering as material.

 

Via the internet I found the Anglo / Stuttgart English-speaking social club for expats. I posted a request. I ended up later in touch with the head, Derek Evans, who told me his story. I listened to it, and wanted to investigate it further. He gave his home number, which could then be checked next to an address via yellow pages, moreover, he gave a place of work, and an email address so that it can then be established whether he works there or not. Other details such as age, place of origin, amount of time living in <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Germany all mean that a source can be verified. We have now conducted a successful telephone interview. (As it happens, he does NOT feel that inter-expat tension is an issue, he is an expat, this is his view, and therefore it is relevant).

 

If you look at other expat websites, such as www.britishexpats.com you will see that it is common place practice / methodology for media to do this. At the time of writing, the latest post on their site reads:

 

“Get a New life BBC Programme

Have you recently ‘Got a New Life’ in Europe?
Have you and your family/ friends been through the rough and the smooth of
relocation to Europe?
'Get a New Life’, BBC2 are looking for a UK family, currently living in Europe to show the realities of relocation.
If you fit the bill, please email
samw@brighter.co.uk

Another example - www.expatfocus.com also operates a media-friendly company policy. Its ‘article writing’ section reads:

“We are always interested in entertaining or informative articles which would be enjoyed by our expat readership. If you would like to write such an article we would be happy to post it to the Expat Focus site and include a link back to your site and/or your contact information. “

I would not consider one of replies posted on this site as material as no one has yet given their full name and details which is the basic the minimum before one can even start to further investigate their story and consider it as material.

 

So far everything else is just names from an internet user.  They might all be true – they certainly seem to represent strong feelings, but ultimately as yet they are just first names of people I don’t know from Adam.

 

If there are more questions please do get in touch again, but I’m afraid I am going to have to now start the majority of my time and energy to those who are serious about standing by the views they claim to feel strongly about, and who are serious about joining the debate (even if it is a controversial issue) instead of criticising those who would raise it. 

 

About this sort of issues bringing expats togheter - I am not trying to bring them apart.

I spent every school holiday as a child in France, (teacher parents), spent teenage years split between Germany, England and Brittany, studied German and French at Uni, (before studying journalism post grad) and have lived off and on in Austria, England and Germany since. 

 

I wouldn’t claim to know a nationality but I would claim to know some foreign nationals and to find their stories interesting and relevant – whether they have or have not experienced inter-expat tension (I have met and interviewed people from both camps). I think one can only do their bit, which is to live in these countries, with the people, study the language / culture, take up work their and interact in good faith and with an open mind with whoever possible.  

 

I maintain, however, that some expats experience and have experienced inter-expat tension, even if it is in subtle forms. I have interviewed many people who have experienced it. Again, of course, this does not mean that all people of the same nationality will be prone to it, that suggestion it wrong, stupid and offensive. It is just as wrong and offensive, however, not to state the case of those it has happened to and I am not prepared to do this.

 

If there are more questions please do get in touch again, but I’m afraid I am going to have to now start the majority of my time and energy to those who are serious about standing by the views they claim to feel strongly about, and who are serious about joining the debate (even if it is a controversial issue) instead of criticising those who would raise it. 

 

 

Best

 

Rob Hyde.

 

(Ends)

 

--
Rob Hyde
BA:German/French
PGCJ:Periodical Journalism
Telephone: +49 (0)173 186 1164
Web: http://www.robhydeglobal.com

Sorry no image available
Posted by Rob Hyde - 14 years ago

Dear Anthony and Carol,

<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 

 

Thank you  for your response. About getting to know the nationalities you mentioned – I don’t claim to and I think it would be both impossible, and downright arrogant to claim that one can ever really ‘know Germans / Italians / French” and the other nationalities you mentioned as a nationality, I think one can only really get to know individuals from a nation, and observe / note these cases.

 

I spent every school holiday as a child in France, (teacher parents), spent teenage years split between Germany, England and Brittany, studied German and French at Uni, (before studying journalism post grad) and have lived off and on in Austria, England and Germany since. 

 

I wouldn’t claim to know a nationality but I would claim to know some foreign nationals and to find their stories interesting and relevant – whether they have or have not experienced inter-expat tension (I have met and interviewed people from both camps). I think one can only do their bit, which is to live in these countries, with the people, study the language / culture, take up work their and interact in good faith and with an open mind with whoever possible. 

 

Like you seem to, I take great offence when people attempt to claim that a whole a  nationality is represented by individuals. In this article for HR Gateway (below), in my monthly column I slammed the British and US press for writing provocative and offensive articles about <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />Ireland and portraying it as xenophobic.

 

To ensure that the article is balanced, the article included interviews with parties from all ends of the Irish political spectrum, from the SDLP to Sinn Fein.

 

 <a href="http://www.robhydeglobal.com/articles/hrgateway/1/">Ireland's Defence of Fortress Europe</a>.

 

(If this web link does not work you can view the article on www.robhydeglobal.com - published articles section).

 

I maintain, however, that some expats experience and have experienced inter-expat tension, even if it is in subtle forms. I have interviewed many people who have experienced it. Again, of course, this does not mean that all people of the same nationality will be prone to it, that suggestion it wrong, stupid and offensive. It is just as wrong and offensive, however, not to state the case of those it has happened to and I am not prepared to do this.

 

I got the impression that you, like other people who posted responses, take offence that a request for expat feedback (neutral term for two sides of the spectrum) was posted in an expat forum, and that you deem this to be easy, cheap and therefore unworthy research.

 

It would indeed by cheap, unworthy research if material was only compiled this way (via internet). I think the ‘dodgy dossier’ story highlights this, and rightly so.

 

Posting a request for Expat feedbvack in an Expat forum, however, is not research. This is an attempt to find / get in touch with people, so that contact can then be made, preferably in person, with a view to hearing their case and considering as material.

 

Via the internet I found the Anglo / Stuttgart English-speaking social club for expats. I posted a request. I ended up later in touch with the head, Derek Evans, who told me his story. I listened to it, and wanted to investigate it further. He gave his home number, which could then be checked next to an address via yellow pages, moreover, he gave a place of work, and an email address so that it can then be established whether he works there or not. Other details such as age, place of origin, amount of time living in Germany all mean that a source can be verified. We have now conducted a successful telephone interview. (As it happens, he does NOT feel that inter-expat tension is an issue, he is an expat, this is his view, and therefore it is relevant).

 

If you look at other expat websites, such as www.britishexpats.com you will see that it is common place practice / methodology for media to do this. At the time of writing, the latest post on their site reads:

 

“Get a New life BBC Programme

Have you recently ‘Got a New Life’ in Europe?
Have you and your family/ friends been through the rough and the smooth of
relocation to Europe?
'Get a New Life’, BBC2 are looking for a UK family, currently living in Europe to show the realities of relocation.
If you fit the bill, please email
samw@brighter.co.uk

Another example - www.expatfocus.com also operates a media-friendly company policy. Its ‘article writing’ section reads:

“We are always interested in entertaining or informative articles which would be enjoyed by our expat readership. If you would like to write such an article we would be happy to post it to the Expat Focus site and include a link back to your site and/or your contact information. “

I would not consider one of replies posted on this site as material as no one has yet given their full name and details which is the basic the minimum before one can even start to further investigate their story and consider it as material.

 

So far everything else is just names from an internet user.  They might all be true – they certainly seem to represent strong feelings, but ultimately as yet they are just first names of people I don’t know from Adam.

 

Final point - about how long I’ve been a journalist – seven years -  have also been published in

 

The Times:

1.  <a href='/images/times.jpg' title='Read the full article'>The Times>

 

The Telegraph

2.  <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/connected/main.jhtml?xml=%2Fconnected%2F2001%2F06%2F21%2Fecnbeck21.xml">The Telegraph</a>

 

The Sunday Express, and expatriate publications likes Expatica.com, Expatrium, The Vienna Reporter, Austria Today etc.  Not much but something. Not quite sure what else you wanted to know.

 

I’m not sure if these web links work here, but you can view them on  http://www.robhydeglobal.com – ‘Published Articles’ section.

 

If there are more questions please do get in touch again, but I’m afraid I am going to have to now start the majority of my time and energy to those who are serious about standing by the views they claim to feel strongly about, and who are serious about joining the debate (even if it is a controversial issue) instead of criticising those who would raise it. 

 

Best

 

Rob Hyde.

 

(Ends)

 

--
Rob Hyde
BA:German/French
PGCJ:Periodical Journalism
Telephone: +49 (0)173 186 1164
Web: http://www.robhydeglobal.com

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Posted by danonimes-184717 - 14 years ago

he didn't say the postings did, he said the "emails" did."Get offa yer horse, an' drink yer milk" - anonor try evening primrose

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Posted by mike-179830 - 14 years ago

quote:Many of the emails expressed shock at the idea that some expats have experienced tension with other expats within a host country, many also found this concept offensive.

None of the postings to The AngloINFO Forum have expressed that at all. They have expressed shock at, and been offended by your methodology.

**************
Mike

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Posted by Rob Hyde - 14 years ago

<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 

Dear AngloInfo,

 

 

Thank you for all who responded to the posting, both via the forum and via the emails sent privately.

 

Many of the emails expressed shock at the idea that some expats have experienced tension with other expats within a host country, many also found this concept offensive.

 

The point of article, (as written in crystal clear terms as a reply to some of the postings), is not to try and collect material proving that all expats hate each other and cannot get on with each other.

 

It is to represent both those that have and have not experienced this, and those which do and which do not feel that this is an issue.  Therefore, the views of those which DO NOT find that this is an issue, are just as relevant as those that do. The original posting therefore deliberately used the words:

I am looking for feedback from any expats who have witnessed this or have views on this”

 

 

Many have expressed views on this (though few were prepared to put their full names next the same words they claimed to feel strongly about). These views (ones which take offence at the idea that inter-expat tension exists) are just as relevant as the views of those who feel that it does exist. Both views / extremes of thought / experiences are necessary for a balanced article.

 

It is COMPLETELY understandable that many expats would feel offended by the suggestion that there any form of tension exists within an expat community. 

 

As many of the responses show, there are many expats who have no problem getting on with each other. Moreover they feel that living as expats and associating with the expat community, gives them a deeper, enriching insight into other cultures than they might not acquire were they simply living in their home country. (Having been raised in England by an English family with strong Irish roots and living within a community of Irish expatriates, spending teenage years split between Brittany, France and Germany, and lived on and off in England, Austria and Germany, and living now as an expat, again, in Germany, I also feel that this enriching, wonderful experience means I have a profound tolerance for people of different nationalities).

 

Therefore, the many expats equipped with these noble notions of tolerance, acceptance and goodwill, the suggestion that any expats are not tolerant or accepting of others, could well seem inaccurate, offensive or ludicrous.

 

These views represent one end of the spectrum, which should and must be acknowledged and reported and it is right that those who feel that it is not true (i.e. there is no / little tension between expats) should be able to express their views and to also know that their views are both respected and noted and that their story is told.  

 

On Friday evening I interviewed American national Derek Evans, a former <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />US military worker who now works at the army air force exchange force, and who is now the head of an English speaking club in Stuttgart.

 

 He feels that there may be the occasional tension between the “wrong sort” of expats, but that his “bringing together of people of all sorts of nationalities” serves to do away with any potential for hostilities. Though he has directly witnessed inter-expat tension, he therefore does not agree that it exists to any great extent. This is his view, and so it has been noted and will appear in the article.

 

In exactly the same way, that it is right and proper and it must be so that that those on end of the spectrum are listened to and acknowledged and that their story is told, it is also right and proper and it must be so that that those on end of the spectrum are listened to and acknowledged and that their story is told.

 

On the same day in which many posted emails expressing shock / outrage at the issue (that some expats have experienced tension with other expats within a host country), I later interviewed a Turkish Alivi, Hakan Yilmaz, (a person who, unlike others felt strongly enough about what he feels to put his name against what he says). 

 

Hakan, 28, who lives in Berlin, is married to a German girl, Maria, and was shocked that he was able to secure a job for a Turkish marketing agency but as soon as he revealed that he was an Alivi, (an ethnic Turkish minority) he was suddenly treated very differently, people began to ignore him and after just two weeks his working atmosphere that he felt he had no choice but to quit his job.

 

Any suggestion that all Turkish expats treat Alivi expats like this – or that a Turk and an Alivi will automatically dislike each other,  is both ridiculous, offensive and plain wrong to both Turks and Alivis alike. At the same time, it is exactly as ridiculous, offensive and plain wrong to not report what is happening even if it is an uncomfortable issue for others to accept. Hakan Yilmaz exists. I have met him and his girl friend and spoken to them at length. He has experienced what he has experienced, and so have his other fellow Alivis I have interviewed.

 

No journalist should be prepared to ignore or to choose not to report on what is happening, even if it causes offence to others – and anyone else who expects this therefore is ultimately asking for a false, biased article. Those who feel inter-expat tensions exist in some form (and who are prepared to put their full name next to their quotes) must and will have their views expressed and story told (like Derek Evans). Those which do feel it exists, must and will have their views expressed and story told (like Hakan Yilmaz).

 

The following quote, as written as a response to some of the people who expressed shock / outrage at the wording of the posting, hopefully summarises this point.

 

“…Thank you for your response.  In terms of you not agreeing with what I have "alleged" to be true - I have not alleged anything. I have reported on what I have witnessed after years of life as an Expat in Germany and in Austria, and also reported what interviewees (so far 27) have told me.

I completely accept that not all, even the majority of expats use common sense to avoid awkward topics, or just out of pure goodwill rub along nicely together. It would be simply inaccurate, however, to claim that there is no tension between any Expats in any host country.

The Turkish / Kurdish riots here happened and they were ugly. I have interviewed 4 British expatriates from Austria who have said that they did not get a job in an Irish bar and were told that they were unlikely to because they are English. The comments on the Austrian / German issue are also from interviews, and this evening I am interviewing a Turkish Expat who comes from an ethnic Turkish minority and who therefore is shunned by other Turkish Expat support groups in Berlin.

Obviously it is inaccurate, and plain wrong and offensive  to suggest that if you are Turkish or Kurdish, or English and Irish, you are automatically going feel hostile towards each other, but I think it is just as inaccurate, wrong and offensive not to report on what has happened to many expats. The article is not being written with a view to trying to slam one nation and promote the other, rather to look at what sorts of tension have occurred, what the causes might be, and then look at ways round it.”

Instead of taking a knee-jerk reaction, and choosing the easy, simple and therefore untrue (not the full picture) approach which is just to slam the situation when expats sometimes express, directly or indirectly, a form of hostility to other expats, I feel it is more interesting to investigate why this is happening.

US national Dave Sperling of www.esl-cafe.com was one of several EFL experts who told me in an interview earlier this year, that although British EFL teachers can easily secure work in America, the reverse is not true. The article then proceeded to look at why this might be happening, instead of being childish about the situation by pointing the finger of blame at someone.

Granted, discrimination is wrong and not to be condoned – but can the reasons why it takes place be explained. Surely only then can the situation be more fully understood and a more adult, enlightened way forwarded be conceived by all parties. 

British-run schools abroad may wish to promote the image of a clear-cut English accent institute, and therefore fear they may lose money by employing Americans. Is this right? - No. Can you understand why they do it? – To some extent. A solution? – Maybe the British schools should also try to incorporate aspects of American English (vocabulary into their lessons by acknowledging it as an existing and widespread form of English), which would therefore mean after time they would not risk damaging their image by employing Americans instead of English.

When I interviewed head of AngloInfo in Brittany, Bob Pearson, he seemed nervous that his organisation would be misrepresented or portrayed as promoting an English ghetto. It wasn’t. Both sides of the argument were presented, as they must be.

 

I therefore continue to welcome feedback from ALL sides of the spectrum, but only from those who feel strongly enough about what they claim to, that they are put their full names next to what they say, where they are from and what they do now, so that the source can be verified.

 

For further details on the years of journalistic experience, Published Articles (including the interview with AngloInfo), see http://www.robhydeglobal.com

 

(Ends)

--
Rob Hyde
BA:German/French
PGCJ:Periodical Journalism
Telephone: +49 (0)173 186 1164
Web: http://www.robhydeglobal.com

Sorry no image available
Posted by danonimes-184717 - 14 years ago

And....... quoted from one of Rob Hyde's articles; "The buying up of beautiful Brittany" (http://www.robhydeglobal.com/articles/telegraph/6/)&lt1;&lt1; AngloInfo.com has now started working with the local Chambers of Commerce by providing them with computers so they can access the site, recognise some of the problems English-speakers are having and look at ways to simplify the registration process."We are not trying to create an English ghetto in Brittany, we want English-speakers to integrate into local life. &gt1;&gt1;It is Friday, isn't it?