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English French Phone/fax adaptors

Posted by Filhudson-184636 - Created: 14 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by me_2003 - 14 years ago

just about a uk phone for 1 pound and  4 pence on ebay...damn that i did not see this add before...

will buy another one from someone french now...

 

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Posted by TonyP-191937 - 14 years ago

There are adapters for laptop modems, but they usually use an RJ11 socket, and they dont ring.

It is quite unusual for people to take their fixed phone with them when they go travelling! so there might not be a market for BT-FT adapters.

Even if you find a cable, without the capacitor it wont ring, but the advantage of the huge FT plug is that there is space inside to insert the capacitor.

Why not ask your local fix-it shop to wire the plug?

Tony

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Posted by Michael and Veronica mobbs - 14 years ago

I want to find an adaptor to use my nice British phone in a FT socket - I've been through the earlier correspondence on this topic and can't use any of the suggestions (e.g. no way could I rewire a phone plug, and I can't get to www.frenchelp@aol.com - perhaps because I'm not signed up to AOL?).Anyway, in my local Leclercs I've seen a telephone travel adaptor for French people going to UK with their phone or modem - so surely there must be an equivalent for Brits in France? I've tried Curry's, Dixon's and Comet websites to no avail. If anyone has found one, please post the details!

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Posted by TonyP-191937 - 14 years ago

The maximum REN of 4 applies to European systems too, but modern electronic phones have a REN of almost nothing.  They just detect the ring signal on the A and B wire and then emit a warble through a different circuit.  Perhaps BT insists that UK phones have a REN of 1 though.

It seems that the whole scheme was designed to prevent other phones in the house tinkling when someone dialed, back in the days of rotary dials and electromagnetic bells.

Tony

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Posted by MikeP-180526 - 14 years ago

I believe the reason BT insist on this set up is because they only allow a certain number of phones on the line (max REN is normally 4).  Each phone sold in the UK and certified for use on a BT network has to have a 'REN' (Ringing Equivalent Number).  BT can run a capacitance check to see if you have more phones than permitted on the line.  If you exceed the capacity,  your phones won't ring properly, or at all,  so it's your problem,  but somehow they feel they have to monitor this.

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Posted by TonyP-191937 - 14 years ago

This link:

http://www.epanorama.net/documents/telecom/uk_wiring.html

explains why UK phones only ring in the UK.  It seems that non UK phones work perfectly well in the UK, so I have no idea why BT still insists an this anachronism for phones sold in the UK.

To get it to ring you have to connect a 1.8 uF capacitor between the white and black wires.

 

Tony

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Posted by Pumuckel - 14 years ago

Hi again,

Thanks for your suggestions. I have tried everything now: cross-over, different FT cables, etc.. I even fiddled around with the wires but the phone's ringer just doesn't work :( I know calls are coming through because the integrated answer phone kicks in after 5 rings. So, how can I get the ringer to work without putting another phone in between (e.g. a cheap FT model)? I was trying to avoid additional "clutter". Can you help?

 

Pumuckel

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Posted by reinrev5 - 14 years ago

Pumuckel,

MikeP's soultion is quite correct but there is often an easier way:-

The lead with the BT plug at one end very often has an RJ11/12 plugging it into your telephone at the other end, this means that you can buy (very easily) a lead with an RJ11/12  at each end. One end will plug into your telephone and the other into a "prise gigogne" (FT plug with an RJ11 or 12 sucket in it).

To avoid the FT plug into plug bit, which I quite agree is hopeless, try using multiple a RJ socket unit. These are discreet and depending on the length of cable you use before and after, can often be  hidden in a corner or wherever. Att. I only found a 3 x RJ45 to 1 x RJ45 socket block. It is about 40 x 15 x 30 mm and the RJ11/12 just uses the central part of the RJ45 socket but it works fine.

If you know someone who can make RJ cables up for you to your desired lengths it is even better.

In the FT plug with the thin bit with the connectors pointing at you and the little "lump" at the bottom of the thin bit, your two main connectors (line 1) are the top two on the right hand side. The second line I'm not sure of but I seem to remember that they are the bottom two on the left.

Reinrev

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Posted by dublinmike-182617 - 14 years ago

Generally speaking your BT plug should only have two connected wires, these go to pins one and three on the FT plug. That's all.

Which way around can be determined by a phone call to you yourself.

So even though the plugs and sockets are all four way, only two are required.

Regards,

Mike

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Posted by Pumuckel - 14 years ago

MikeP: a BT-RJ11 crossover is exactly what I am looking for. I tried a few shops along the Cote but wasn't successful. Do you know a shop which definitely sells that type of crossover? Nice/Antibes/Cannes area. Thanks for letting me know.

 

Pumuckel