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Expats or immigrants?

Posted by Paul Carmel-190537 - Created: 14 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by mikem-181687 - 14 years ago

"Ergo, an ex-patriot is an expensive piece of wreckage lying in the Mediterranean sun.

Quod est demonstrandum

Mya arenaria samsonitum"

 

Very good, Sam, made me laugh!

 

mikem

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Posted by Vics - 14 years ago

Hi Angel,I don't know about anybody else, but Latin was compulsary at my school, until the Third Year (which I think is now Year 9 ) and I also took it as a GCSE option at 15 years old. I'm 24 now and they still offer it as an option at my school so there must be other people of my generation who had to suffer "puella est in forum" and other useful phrases! Oh and the one you were looking for is"Nolite Te Bastarde Carborundorum"Vics x

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Posted by cleo-185556 - 14 years ago

Hi!

So what about the Welsh-speaking people in Swansea (or Abertawe)! I mean they should be on the rise given that its now compulsory to learn Welsh at school until the age of 16... Having said that I can't remember anything I learnt for my GCSE. Thank goodness I didn't have to do Latin too!!

Anyway, apart from that I'm not very keen on the "ex-pat" thing either but I think its because we relate it to the dreaded "ex-pat community" which as far as I'm concerned doesn't really apply here. My dad, however continuously tells me that he's going to retire to the Costa del Sol which is exactly what "ex-pat" conjures up in my mind! Personally I think if it makes him happy then that's fine but it certainly isn't my idea of living abroad.

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Posted by Sam the clam-189505 - 14 years ago

Although I dozed through a large part of my ten years of compulsory Lat., my old English teacher and Mr. Webster would both argue  ex-parte  that expatriate is also a verb and means 'to force oneself or someone else to live away from one's own or his own country.'

A Patriot is a U.S. air-defence solid fuel missile with command direction. Regularily used by Israel against incoming Scud missiles from Iraq during the first Gulf War

Ergo, an ex-patriot is an expensive piece of wreckage lying in the Mediterranean sun.

Quod est demonstrandum

Mya arenaria samsonitum

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Posted by Paul Carmel-190537 - 14 years ago

Hi Legend,

Frankly I dont mind what people call me ( as long as it's not to early in the morning ) As for being labelled, we all are in some way or another, whether we like it or not. If you like to think of yourself as European or whatever  then you have just made your own label.

Ultimately I was just curious about the correct terminology, rather than wanting/needing to know what I should call myself, or even being bothered on a personal level.  It was just out of interest and yes, you're correct, to spark a bit of debate.

Cheers, PC

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Posted by angel-187474 - 14 years ago

It is a real shame Latin was dropped from the general school curriculum as it would make understanding and learning different languages so much easier - let alone one's proper tongue.

The only Latin I can remember is:   O! Plus! Perge! Aio! Hui! Hem!   (Oh! More! Go on! Yes! Ooh! Ummm!)

JUST KIDDING!  (Just happened to stumble across that one in my search for the only phrase I ever learned - which I've forgotten already ... something to do with "Don't let the bastards grind you down"). 

Unfortunately (and obviously) Latin was long dropped before I was at school!  Do some schools still offer it as an 'option', anyone know?

 

xx. A

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Posted by mike-179830 - 14 years ago

legend_in_my_lunchtime:

There's an important difference between an ex-patriot and an expatriate. The former is someone who used to love "their country" but no longer does; the latter is simply someone who used to live there, but no longer does.

To be an expatriate, one must necessarily have moved from one country to another.

So, techncially, someone who has moved from Edgbaston to Edinburgh could be so labelled, but not from Llannerch-y-medd to Swansea. However, as all these places are within the same nation (if not country) the point may be moot.

Bah - bring back compulsory Latin and this sort of confusion wouldn't exist :-)

**************
Mike

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Posted by angel-187474 - 14 years ago

Legend's post has made me think back to my days DownUnder where I often worked with a mix of different nationalities.  Did I ever think of them as "immigrants", "expatriots" or "foreigners" .... ?   Funny thing is, I can't remember the terms ever crossing my mind.  I did think of them as 'lucky people' however - fortunate to have the occasion to experience other cultures and lifestyles.xx. A

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Posted by legend_in_my_lunchtime-182603 - 14 years ago

I realise that your curiosity might be just to spark debate, so I'll reply with the counter question : "Why do you want to label yourself in such a way"?

Would you use an expat/immigrant label for someone who had moved from London to Birmingham?  Or, (perhaps implied by the term "patriot") do you predicate this label on the change of country  ?  In which case, how would you label people moving from Edgbaston to Edinburgh?  Or Carlisle to Cardiff? 

Do you believe it needs a change of language before you qualify for the label?  Like moving from Llannerch-y-medd to Swansea perhaps?

I think it is a peculiarity of the English speaking nations to "badge" themselves as "expats" - particularly prominent when there are old colonial style watering holes at which to gather. 

Just on the lighter side: The French will see you as "ressortissant du communauté européenne" if they are polite.  Otherwise, get used to the fact that at least here, your are known as "étranger". 

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Posted by Sam the clam-189505 - 14 years ago

One could argue that an immigrant is someone who has been expatriated,whereas an ex-patriot is someone who emmigrated.

Feel free to expatiate