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Opinions on clim reversible

Posted by szozu - Created: 14 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by Tinker-186005 - 14 years ago

In case anyones interested you cannot install cold underfloor clim within a 50km radious of the sea due to the humidity just as TonyP suggested it leaves you with wet slippery floors and so forth, but it work to great effect in central France, ah well back to the fans!!Tinker

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Posted by Tinker-186005 - 14 years ago

Dear Tony P, thanks for the help it also had occurred to me that the floor would be slippery, I have someone coming in on Monday so I'll put this to them, I hadn't thought of going via the garden so thats helpful too Cheers TinkerTinker

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Posted by TonyP-191937 - 14 years ago

I have heard of systems like this that use geothermal heat pumps. There is a system of pipes buried in the garden, and a heat pump can exchange heat between the house and the garden.

Those systems can work both ways.  If you have to install a separate refrigeration unit to cool the water it might not be worth while.

Humidity might also be a problem.  Air can contain a lot of moisture which condenses out as the temperature drops, for example yesterday at Nice the temperature was 20C and the dew point 15C so if the underfloor cooling was at say 12C, it would get wet from condensation.

This is also a problem with the typical split clims because they cool the air without removing moisture.  They dont cool it enough to form fog, but the air feels a bit too humid when it is cool.  Car systems and the industrial ducted systems remove some moisture as well.

I would guess underfloor cooling works best in larger buildings where the air is also conditioned to remove moisture.

Tony

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Posted by Tinker-186005 - 14 years ago

Dear Tony P, Ha Ha  you know perfectly well what I'm asking, 1. I have a gas fueled boiler giving me Hot Water to Heat the Underfloor Pipes that Heat the House 2. It is possible to reverse this system with COLD water but it need to be Very cold hence the Refrigeration system; 3.Simply asking if anyone has experience of this....Tinker

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Posted by TonyP-191937 - 14 years ago

Tinker,

You are looking for a gas-powered air conditioning unit?

I guess since there are gas powered fridges why not gas powered clim.

Still, you might be looking for a long time.

Tony

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Posted by szozu - 14 years ago

Good explanation, Tony. I did gather from both the EDF and from our neighbourhood clim vendor that using the unit is cheaper than conventional electric heating because it doesn't actually heat, but wasn't able to comprehend how it achieved this feat!

Lana

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Posted by Tinker-186005 - 14 years ago

Since we are on the subject, I have gas heated water underfloor heating and I am looking into having the reverse fitted for the summer, a type of refrigeration unit that lowers the temperature of the house, has anyone done this and if so what is your opinion? Thanks Tinker

Tinker

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Posted by TonyP-191937 - 14 years ago

The "clim reversible" is cost effective because it just pumps heat from outside rather than generating it. 

You still have to pay for the electricity to drive the motor but this is much less than the electricity needed to generate the same amount of heat.

They are most efficient when the outside temperature is not too low, the colder it gets the harder the pump has to work to scavenge the heat.  Once the outside temperature gets a few degrees below freezing they dont work at all.  At around 7 deg most units use about 1Kw to pump 3Kw of heat.

Thats why it is usually more efficient to leave them on during the day, perhaps at a lower setting, because then the outside air is still relatively warm and the unit works more efficiently.

Tony

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Posted by szozu - 14 years ago

After receiving a bill of 965 EUR for six months of electricity usage, in addition to paying the usual bill of 68 EUR every two months, we called in the EDF for some advice. The guy told us that clim reversible would heat the room efficiently as well as cutting our heating costs to 1/3 of what we're paying now, though I found this difficult to believe. The EDF says to never turn off the heat for cost efficiency. They say you should simply lower it a few degrees at night or when you'll be out for a long time.

I discovered the most cost-efficient heating method in Spain. Everywhere you go, you see tables that have two levels with a hole cut out for the piece near the floor. They put a heavy tablecoth made out of velour or similar material on top with a piece of glass to cover it and a round electric heater sits in the hole. You sit around the table with the tablecloth on your lap and you're guaranteed to start perspiring within about 10 minutes! These units used to be filled with charcoal before the advent of electricity and consume next to nothing in energy, but they do restrict movement somewhat!

Lana

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Posted by tkw - 14 years ago

Yes, it was professionally installed (by the owners, not us) but I just did some googling and it may not be adequately sized for the room as both rooms have the same model and they are vastly different volumes. 2kW may be enough for the bedroom but I doubt it is enough for the main room. btw its a Daikin.. check out www.daikin.fr its a monosplit wallmount FTY model. Normally we would turn it off during the day and turn it on when we got home and leave it on all night. Maybe it would have been better to just turn it down when we left instead of off but then you can just hear it sucking the electricity in the back of your mind..very distracting while at work.

One other thing to consider with any heating system with a fan is the noise. Ours is rated at 26dB PV, 35 dB GV (whatever the difference is I don't know maybe min and max) and I could sleep with it on nearly max however I've seen others rated at 43 dB...thats a big difference as decibels are logarithmic.

Still don't see how a heater mounted high on the wall can be as efficient as a heater mounted low near the floor... Also if you just want heating then why get a system where you have to put a big box outside with a big tube in between? It should also be much cheaper to install radiators than clim.