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where have all the tourists gone??

Posted by Shrek 2-196274 - Created: 13 years ago
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10 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 10)

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Posted by lynnettejane - 13 years ago

Mike P , I agree that people should not be stereotyped because of the air line they use, that would be stupid because as you say, rich and poor alike use them. The observaton that they don't spend money I believe came from a French business man. Actually I believe they would spend if they thought they were getting good value. However, I don't believe that all bad behaviour is due to poor upbringing and lack of morals. I am sure that there are plenty of people who behave decently at home, but become totally different when they are away. And then of course there are those who couldn't care less about anyone else who just want to 'have a laugh' and don't care how badly they behave to achieve it.regards Lynnette

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Posted by MikeP-180526 - 13 years ago

You can see the type of drunken foul behaviour to which Lynettejane refers almost any Friday or Saturday night of the week in Antibes.  It has nothing to do with being wealthy or poor, it has to do with upbringing and morals, nor to do with the airline or mode of transport those people use to get here. I recently heard of an incident of such behaviour on the top deck of a 747 en route to Barbados - not the type of destination associated with the penniless!

The 'lowcost' airlines may have contributed to a change in the demographic pattern of the type of tourists that come here, but it is grossly untrue to imply that everybody who uses them 'has no money' or belongs to any particular social class. I know plenty of business people,  some incredibly wealthy, who use them regularly and frequently and are not ashamed to admit that they do so.

Simply what's happening, to get back on topic, is that people are voting with their feet, as the saying goes, or if they do choose to come here for the weather and the scenery,  they go 'self catering', or they go inland, not to save money, but because they do not want to be subjected to the abysmal service and high prices which are associated with the coastal strip.

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Posted by lynnettejane - 13 years ago

It's hard to figure out what many people who have contributed to this thread would actually like to see happen to the cda. More toursts; less tourists;good? bad?  During the wonderful Thatcher years we were told that competition is good, and there was some truth in that. However, there seems to be an undercurrent of closet snobbery here when certain types of people who are now accessing the cda via airlines like easyjet are referred to. So if the cda wants tourists then it may have to put with 'easyjet people who do not spend', or lower their prices so that they do, in which case more will come. So how is the cda to be marketed and who should be that target market be? Should its image be promoted as the up- market, exclusive place it is supposed to be, which supports higher prices, and which now does not seem to be working, or should it be promoted to the masses, and we have all seen where that can lead for holiday resorts? Can there be a balance, or we destined to see the drunken, foul behaviour that has been the disgrace of Britain and other countries for many years?

 

regards Lynnette

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Posted by Interiordesigner-197201 - 13 years ago

Hi

Agree with almost everything Mike said, except about the locals.

We have wonderful neighbours (French) who have shown us kindness which exceeded what I would call neighbourly friendship in difficult times. They even threw a welcome drinks party for us when we arrived. Originally there was a slight personal interest, but there isnt anymore and we are still invited to dinner/invite them to dinner, the friendships are still going strong. In general we are involved in village life, know a lot of people who we socialise with. Maybe this is because we live 20 minutes into the arriere pays...who knows.

 

 

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Posted by MikeP-180526 - 13 years ago

Simon T

On balance, if this is the way you feel about the UK (and I agree to an extent) you would be making a good lifestyle move.

As long as you are prepared to live with the daily frustrations of poor service and rudeness,  or isolate yourself from them, you will be fine. 

Don't expect the locals to befriend you on anything more than a superficial and possibly self-interested basis in anything other than rare cases.  If you have your own circle of friends, or if your home life is such that you need little outside influence,  then again, you'll cope with it.

Don't expect people to respect your property,  for example if you are used to driving a decent car and keeping it in good condition, you will be disappointed here if you park it in the street and find that within days it will be covered in small dents and scratches.

You appear to have researched your move.  Hopefully you have looked into the tax and other financial implications.  Life on the CDA is not necessarily less expensive (this may not be an issue!).

At least here you will see a blue sky for probably 250 days a year.  However the CDA has its share of rain and grey weather, and can get cold.

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Posted by MikeP-180526 - 13 years ago

Simon T

On balance, if this is the way you feel about the UK (and I agree to an extent) you would be making a good lifestyle move.

As long as you are prepared to live with the daily frustrations of poor service and rudeness,  or isolate yourself from them, you will be fine. 

Don't expect the locals to befriend you on anything more than a superficial and possibly self-interested basis in anything other than rare cases.  If you have your own circle of friends, or if your home life is such that you need little outside influence,  then again, you'll cope with it.

Don't expect people to respect your property,  for example if you are used to driving a decent car and keeping it in good condition, you will be disappointed here if you park it in the street and find that within days it will be covered in small dents and scratches.

You appear to have researched your move.  Hopefully you have looked into the tax and other financial implications.  Life on the CDA is not necessarily less expensive (this may not be an issue!).

At least here you will see a blue sky for probably 250 days a year.  However the CDA has its share of rain and grey weather, and can get cold.

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Posted by Simon T-196395 - 13 years ago

My wife and I are about to take a property on a long term rental in the Cannes area, the intention is that this will become our main home with my wife being based here full time with our new baby and I will be commuting to the UK on a weekly basis working a 3-4 day week there returning to cda for extended weekends. This whole move and lifestyle will I am sure bring with it its own problems and frustrations but we are doing it in the belief that we will in overall terms improve our quality of life.

Having read a good percentage of the comments on the decline of tourism subject, that seem to have become a vehicle for people to express their disatisfaction about life on the cda I am increasingly concerned that maybe we are about to make a huge mistake in relocating to cda and would be better off staying in the UK watching the rain being lashed on the window panes by gale force winds in top daytime temperatures of 17c in the middle of so called summer when as hard as I try I cannot remember the last time seeing a truly cloudless sky!!!!!!!!

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Posted by dublinmike-182617 - 13 years ago

Thank you ken for the sensible and informative post.

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Posted by kensmith-197043 - 13 years ago

Very interesting discussion here. As a semi-retired American who visited the Riviera the first time five years ago and has lived in Nice off-and-on for only the past two years, I have been surprised by how few English-speaking tourists there are. It seems to have changed in the past month or so, but I can go a week or so without hearing a British or American tourist speaking at a nearby table.My quite unscientific count for the past several weeks tells me that there are high numbers of Italian, Russian, Spanish and Serbian tourists here. Lately, I've heard a few of Americans, mostly young women students. (Don't the young American men know this and why aren't they here? Maybe that's what the young American women are getting away from.)As for the traditional tourists, I've heard some interesting comments from French business owners. Last spring, I went to the Sunday market in Antibes. It was very crowded. I was chatting with the owner of an upscale gift shop and I said that the crowd must be good for business. "No," she said, "they are all easyJet people. They never buy anything."Last June, I was talking with the owner of a brasserie on the Prom and I asked him about his business. He said he had owned the brasserie for 20 years. "It was very good at first, but in the past several years business has been terrible," he said. "There are new kinds of tourists now and they don't spend money. Instead of eating in a restaurant, they get pizza or a kabob and take it back to their hotel room."Just guessing, but it seems likely that there is a big shift underway in the types of tourists coming here. The low-cost airlines are making it possible for the middle classes to come to the Riviera more often, while the affluent are going elsewhere.On the front page of Nice-Matin last Friday, there was a banner headline about the Nice airport setting a record in July for the number of passengers passing through. For the first time, the number of passengers at the Nice airport passed 1 million -- 1,031,717. The old record was 998,000 in July 2002. There was a slump last year, which Nice-Matin attributes to the war in Iraq.Nice-Matin said this increase was despite an 8% decline in the number of flights, and what that means is that the planes are near capacity. What that really means for tall people like myself is the seat rows are closer, less leg room and there is a greater chance of fighting for elbow room while sitting in a middle seat.Note: I'm not complaining about easyJet. Love that airline. Last month, I took the first easyJet flight from Nice to Dortmund, Germany. There's nothing special about Dortmund (no offense intended), but the flight was only 19 euros each way. So, why not?The Nice-Matin article said that much of the increase is a result of increased flights from the low-cost airlines, particularly easyJet. Also, there has been a significant increase in air service from Scandinavia, Poland, Russia, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates. The Nice-New York flights, which Nice-Matin interestingly describes as "emblématique", are showing a 39% increase in passengers since January after a poor showing last year, again because of the war in Iraq.Compared to last year, the number of visitors from the UK is up 14% for all airlines -- low-cost and the misnamed full service airlines. Nice-Matin said that international traffic at the Nice airport is increasing because of the new low-cost airlines and also because of the growing number of Nordics and British who have second homes here who take advantage of the low fares and frequent flights to come here for a few days.And, speaking of a big shift, I recall reading an article last year about how high tech companies on the Riviera have now surpassed tourism in annual revenue. --Ken

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Posted by Shrek 2-196274 - 13 years ago

I see the first bar/restaurant has been advertised for sale on angloinfo...sign of times to come???