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Rosbeefs!!!

Posted by Jelly-193845 - Created: 14 years ago
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Having watched the France-England game in an English bar last nite in Nice may I commend the great atmosphere had by both sides. 

It was only until we got outside that we encountered 'anti Rosbeefs' chants in the streets. Great credit to the group of English lads who walked away and tried to shake hands. Good on ya. We're not all bad you know!!!

 

Jelly

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8 replies (Showing replies: 1 to 8)

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Posted by Happy Days-188415 - 13 years ago

I have to agree with Collie that there has been a marked increase in the number of people stumbling down the streets of Dublin, intoxicated to the extreme and i think the linkage between the celtic tiger and the increase in this drink culture is justified.

But i think simply put....people have more money and there is no incentive to save due to bad interest rates, following from this there is an increase in rentals rather than house purchases which allows people the freedom to go out and spend a fortune on a night out in Dublin!

Happy Days

:)

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Posted by Collie21 - 13 years ago

Perhaps some will agree and some will disagree with me but its just my personal experience I am recounting Jelly so don't take it as carved in stone. I grew up in a town where in the late 1980's as in every decade before emigration was strong. They saying was everyone had a relative living abroad. Dublin to me had a village like atmosphere in that you could go anywhere and feel safe and walk into any pub and end up chatting to someone. With the economic revolution in the mid 90's came many immigrants to Ireland which was very new and for my part very interesting and very welcome. House prices rose so fast that people who traditionally had a history of owning their own home were faced with renting for life. Wages rose, many emigree's came home but not for too long as the social services were better in Germany for example than in Ireland. Money was flying around but no one was sure who had it. Young people seemed to decide that house morgatge and pension were a waste of time and they would enjoy themselves. The sad fact is the Irish pub in Dublin is almost dead and gone, people don't learn to hold their drink anymore and barman don't refuse you if you have had enough like they did in the 80s. All the pubs are barn like, tvs, piped music, and Friday night all the emergency wards in hospitals are full of young girls (18-22) who are comatose on drink. Perhaps the financial riches and increase in the cost of living have blurred or even obliterated the sense of culture and talk and people that used to be there and now there is frustration and anger that when things are so good, the individual still can't seem to get the house or career that they want. Maybe this stress then takes itself out on the streets. Its not that I want to say that a wealthy country is a dangerous one, but rather the change in finances and the change in safety seem to have come at the same time. Linked well I have tried to show how perhaps they are but I am not really sure. I do know that when French women walk down irish streets they are generally not pestered by youths who give them vocal but graphic discriptions of what they want to do to them. Let me reiterate I am only surmising and giving a theory here and hopefully not offending anyone. I have spent most of my adult life in the pub, talking and drinking, never got into a fight and more often than not left very sober at the end of the night, hence the original response to your posting about giving credit. It didn't occur to me that I should get credit for being a decent ordinary bloke.Sincerelycollie21hey does that wall have a crack in it?

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Posted by Jelly-193845 - 13 years ago

Hey Collie

That's an interesting point! Please explain what you mean about the correlation with poor and safer? 

Jelly

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Posted by Collie21 - 13 years ago

Fair enough you have sold me on it. I just think its a shame we have come to that as a society in General, as regards Grafton street henry street and any other street you care to mention, well lets just say its part of the reason I live here now but I will say when the country was poorer only 10-15 years ago, it was a very safe place.Collie21hey does that wall have a crack in it?

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Posted by Jelly-193845 - 13 years ago

Collie

I also agree with Jupiter that it is not easy to do the right thing, even though it is the most logical thing to do. Though what's logical to one man is not to another!

I agree, it's a shame that we give credit for the obvious right things to do, but isn't this is similair to conditining children/people in society to behave in an appropriate manner. If we didn't credit/applaud or acknowledge that behaviour it would not be re-inforced and would not become the norm in society. Putting my comments in context, the English have a bad reputation with football abroad, they fight if they win or lose. Unlike the Irish, for example, who party if they win or lose! So by giving some credit & acknowledgement to those drunken lads I observed outside the bar, I feel I am re-inforcing positive desired social behaviour, especially since we have a problem with hooliginism in our sports. A small minority I know, but a big enough one to allow us to be labelled. Perhaps the Brits are becoming more like the Irish eh Collie? But hey, no, I've lived in Dublin, and what a very danagerous place Grafton Street/Henry street is on a Saturday nite!!! Credit where it's due to the drunken lads that go home after the pubs without kicking the stuffing out of each other. Logical to some, but not to others.  

Jelly

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Posted by Jelly-193845 - 13 years ago

As English fans abroad we get a rough deal!!! Those boys were a credit to our wonderful country...................

Jelly

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Posted by Jupiter-196034 - 13 years ago

Walking away from confrontation is the right thing to do, yes,  but it is not always the easiest of things to do for some people. At/after a match or indeed anywhere at all.

Credit should always be given anyway, even if it is for something that should be done without it being considered (yes, even when one does the right thing) Like a 'please' or 'thank you'. These words are too often forgotten.

Regards.

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Posted by Collie21 - 13 years ago

Just wondering why is it great credit to walk away. It would seem like the normal logical sensible thing to do, and no needs credit for doing the right thing. Now if it were a brave thing I would understand. But really never having been in a football brawl but on the loosing side many times I just decide ok next time maybe. I really don't get why anyone needs to get credit for walking away from a bit of slagging over a football match. Please explain.Collie21hey does that wall have a crack in it?